North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
Wildlife Commission and Partners Create Better Habitat for Rare Wildlife Species

Wildlife Commission and Partners Create Better Habitat for Rare Wildlife Species

In September, staff with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with partners and volunteers, planted 900 red spruce seedlings on the Pisgah National Forest to help create better habitat for many rare wildlife species including the Carolina northern flying squirrel, red crossbill, brown creeper and northern saw-whet owl. READ MORE

Friday, October 27, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (6114)/Comments (0)/
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Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

A $200 bounty on hellbenders? Say it’s not so.

“That is a rumor and absolutely untrue,” said Lori Williams, a Wildlife Diversity biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “Furthermore, the Eastern hellbender is listed as a species of special concern in North Carolina. Harming, harassing, collecting or killing one is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can result in a fine and up to 120 days in jail.”

Hellbenders are one of the largest salamanders found in North Carolina, averaging 16-17 inches long but can grow up to 24 inches long.

Also called the “water dog,” “snot otter,” “Alleghany alligator,” among other names, the hellbender is a harmless, giant aquatic salamander found in fast-moving, clean mountain streams in . . .
 

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Tuesday, May 09, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (16153)/Comments (0)/
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Help! I found a wild animal!

Help! I found a wild animal!

Would you know what to do if you find an injured wild animal? Do you know who to call for wildlife problems or concerns? The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission receives thousands of calls each year on these kinds of issues, so we thought we’d share a few frequently asked questions that come up in the spring and our best advice for each scenario. I found a fawn! Female deer hide their fawns while they feed, returning several times a day to care for them. People find these fawns and worry that they have been orphaned, but most of the time, they’re not. Unless the fawn is in distress (calling incessantly, visibly injured, or found next to a dead doe), we advise people to leave it in place and check back in 24 hours. If it’s still in the same spot the next day, call a licensed fawn rehabilitator for guidance. I found a bird that can’t fly! In the spring, people often call to report a bird fluttering... (click blog title to read more)
Monday, April 17, 2017/Author: Naomi Avissar/Number of views (1635)/Comments (0)/
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“Herps” in the House at Reptile and Amphibian Day this Saturday

“Herps” in the House at Reptile and Amphibian Day this Saturday

It is going to be a hopping, slithering, slinking kind of day this Saturday at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences in downtown Raleigh when the 23rd Annual Reptile and Amphibian Day kicks off at 9 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. The free event, which draws thousands of people each year, highlights the biology, ecology and conservation needs of reptiles and amphibians around the world. 

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the North Carolina chapter of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NCPARC), will have a booth on the third floor of the museum (just as you come off the escalator) with live reptiles and amphibians — collectively known as “herps.” READ MORE

 

Monday, March 06, 2017/Author: Anonym/Number of views (5032)/Comments (0)/
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What's Scarier than Bats at Halloween? A World Without Bats!

What's Scarier than Bats at Halloween? A World Without Bats!

What’s scarier than bats at Halloween? A world without bats, that’s what. While bats may get a bad rap, they are hugely important in the ecosystem, playing key roles in keeping us healthy and well fed. Consider this:  Bats eat tons of insects, like mosquitoes that can carry diseases that make us sick. A nursing female bat may consume almost her entire body weight in insects in one night.  Bats are important pollinators and seed spreaders, both of which aid in plant reproduction and forest regrowth. But bats are in trouble. BIG trouble because of a deadly disease known as white-nose syndrome. It has killed millions of bats in the eastern United States, including bats in western North Carolina. Some bat hibernacula — caves and mines — in western North Carolina have seen dramatic population declines although these declines associated with the deadly disease appear to be leveling off in some areas. White-nose syndrome, a...
Friday, October 30, 2015/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (1608)/Comments (0)/
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