Conserve & Protect
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Author: Created: 11/30/2011 10:30 AM
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Blog
By NCWRC blogger on 12/21/2012 1:25 PM
Once the gifts are unwrapped and the turkey is eaten on Christmas Day, forgo that comfy couch and instead head outdoors with your binoculars and bird ID guide in hand to participate in the longest-running citizen-science survey in the world.

Now in its 113th Year, the Annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count is a perfect way for you to make an enormous contribution to bird conservation in North Carolina, regardless if you’re a backyard birder or a serious field observer. Best of all, it’s free and pretty easy to do, too. Just visit Audubon’s website to sign up and find a count near you.

According to Audubon,which organizes the annual count, the count takes place within “count circles,” which focus on specific geographical areas. Each circle is led by a count compiler and each count is conducted on a specific day. Once you sign up,you’ll find a list of more than 50 Christmas Bird Count circles located across the state, as well as the email addresses for the count compilers. Some count compilers request pre-registrations. Others just advise you to show up on the day of the count.

...
By NCWRC blogger on 12/20/2012 11:02 AM
Successful crappie fishing in winter can be as simple as finding baitfish. So, where to look? As the water temps this time of year really start to plunge, baitfish leave the shallows and head to the main creek and river channels. They pack into huge schools and often suspend directly over the channel. When this happens, you can bet the larger predator fish will be close. This is when a fish finder really will come in handy. It not only will show you where the channels are, but it also will show you big schools of baitfish, along with the larger fish hanging below the bait or at least near the bait. Many fishermen will automatically think they need to run down to the deep water near the dam, but on many reservoirs, these large pods of bait will gather in the deepest water just down from the upper dam. This can be a mile or two down...
By NCWRC blogger on 12/14/2012 2:35 PM
Nothing can discourage a new hunter, or a seasoned sportsman, quicker than a miserable hunt. Unexpected weather, poor planning and lack of equipment can all lead to a hunt that, well, didn’t seem worth leaving the truck for.

We’ve compiled some tips that may not ensure harvesting yourdream buck, but will make sure you arrive home safe, warm and in one piece.

Here goes.

Always bring rain gear. Nothing guarantees a surprise gully washer like forgetting the things that keep you dry. Purchase your license well in advance. Review and follow safety procedures to avoid hurting yourself, a friend or a non-hunter. Also review regulations if you aren’t sure of the laws. Even if you think you are sure, it never hurts to review them again. ...
By NCWRC blogger on 11/27/2012 11:21 AM
Last year North Carolina hunters harvested more than 2,000 black bears, from the mountains to the coast. And while those bears might be a great accomplishment and trophy to the hunters who bagged them, they are just as valuable to us at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.
By NCWRC blogger on 11/19/2012 4:05 PM

This time of year is a season for tradition and heritage. People will gather with families and friends reminiscing about old times,enjoying the present and making memories for the future — from eating turkey,watching football, drinking eggnog, hanging greenery and hunting. The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission through its Home From The Hunt™ campaign urges everyone not to overlook the safety aspects of your hunting outings with family and friends.

By NCWRC blogger on 11/15/2012 9:36 AM
Bennett Wynne, a biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Division of Inland Fisheries, was recognized at the Commission’s business meeting last week for selection as the 2012 Fisheries Biologist of the Year — an honor bestowed on him by the Southeastern Association of State Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
By NCWRC blogger on 11/9/2012 1:20 PM

RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 9, 2012) — State Fairs and County Fairs may have ended last month, but follow-up work and debriefings continue into the winter. One topic of discussion within the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission addresses the Wildlife Diversity Buttons T-shirt that was developed in cooperation with Neuse Sport Shop this year as a fund-raiser for the Wildlife Diversity Program.
By NCWRC blogger on 10/30/2012 10:09 AM
RALEIGH,N.C. (Oct. 30, 2012) — Chalk up this topic as one of the things that make you go, “Hmmmmmmmmmmm.” Think about it. It wasn’t that long ago when we all would have yawned at the idea of buying, selling and trading water rights as a natural resource commodity as valuable as timber rights or mineral rights. And we would have outright LOLed (had we known what the acronym stood for) at the thought of going to the grocery store to buy bottled spring water, water filters, flavored water, and just plain ol’ drinking water.

But these days water is, indeed, a limiting factor — an important resource to consider in community planning for humans, and an integral factor in the equation of fish and wildlife management. Nowhere is this more important than in the arid Southwest of the United States where wildlife managers and biologists...
By NCWRC blogger on 10/26/2012 2:08 PM
A blustery, rainy weekend is blowing its way into North Carolina — at least for much of the eastern portion of the state. And while the weather isn’t ideal for outdoor activities, it is ideal for cooking up a big, steaming batch of venison chili. 

I’ve been making chili for a long time and am always lookingfor different recipes to try and tweak. Last weekend, I found — and tested — a rather unusual chili recipe,one that combines chocolate and lots of spices. Despite its heat, it was verytasty twist on my usual chili recipe so I thought I’d share it with you.

One caveat: it is rather spicy, so if you have tender tastebuds, ease back on the spices, but not the chocolate. It really does make adifference!

If you have a favorite venison recipe, feel free to share it with others on this blog. And if you’re not hankering for chili but want to try some new venison recipes, check out the Wildlife Commission’s recipe book here....
By NCWRC blogger on 10/24/2012 2:03 PM

Hunters are required to wear a cap, hat or an outer garment in blaze orange that is visible from all sides whenever they are hunting bear, feral hogs, deer,rabbit, squirrel, grouse, pheasant or quail with a firearm. Archery hunters hunting deer during the muzzleloading or gun season also must wear blaze orange anytime during that season. 

Blaze orange, also known as hunter orange for obvious reasons, isn’t a color found in nature, making it instantly recognizable as a human presence. 

More information here

Recent Entries

"Bama" Spotted Bass in Lake Norman?
The Importance of Hunter Mentors
Black Bears Rebound in State by Abbie Bennett
Blackpowder Hunting Clarified
The Monster Blue Cats of Lake Gaston
Prescribed Burns Explained
Shelley Lake Fawn Rescued by Linda Chamblee

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