Conserve & Protect
The Blog of N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission

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Author: Created: 11/30/2011 10:30 AM
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Blog
By NCWRC blogger on 2/20/2014 9:32 AM
[Editor’s Note:Since the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission started its Facebook page in January 2012, our “What Is It Wednesday?” feature has been a popular weekly feature — sometimes even generating more Likes, Shares and Comments than all other combined FB posts during the same week. Eventually, we knew that we’d come across a WIIW post for which no definitive answer could be provided — even by Wildlife Commission staff. That day is upon us. Read on for the back story of the bear/rabbit/sabre tooth tiger/Yeti track in the snow, and a summary of an informal conversation among four WRC Wildlife Biologists as they hypothesized what the enlarged/distorted track in melting snow might be.]

Message and Photo Sent to WRC FB Page

“I live in the Davidson County part of Clemmons, NC (on the Yadkin River). I found this...
By NCWRC blogger on 2/18/2014 3:22 PM
By Mark Knelson, Guest Blogger

I found these (deer hunting) seminars to be both extremely instructional and very interesting. While no one in my family in recent years had hunted I had some interest and these seminars proved to be the perfect opportunity to allow me to pursue this exciting sport. I was lucky enough to discuss these seminars with one of my buddies at work who is a long-time hunter having hunted with his father for years and now teaching his son.

He agreed to act as a mentor with the understanding that there was much more to hunting than simply going out and shooting an animal.Obviously, I completely agree and was able to enjoy the tract that has been in his families’ hands for many years north of Greensboro. We also built a very nice stand, reviewed images from game cameras, put out corn and salt and walked...
By NCWRC blogger on 2/7/2014 8:07 AM
Little Washington is the place to be this coming weekend as the East Carolina Wildlife Arts Festival and North Carolina Decoy Carving Championships gets underway, starting on Friday at 6 p.m. with a special preview event and oyster roast. Tickets for this event are $40 per person, and include admittance to the entire festival, which opens to the public on Saturday at 9 a.m. and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Tickets the weekend are $12.

During the special preview on Friday night, festival organizers will unveil the portrait that will become the 2014 North Carolina Waterfowl Conservation Stamp and Print, also known as the North Carolina duck stamp.

Along with more than 75 other vendors and exhibitors, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will have a booth at the festival, in the sportsman tent, located in front of the North Carolina Estuarium at 223...
By NCWRC blogger on 2/5/2014 3:58 PM
This is reprinted from a news release dated July 10, 2008.

 RALEIGH, N.C. (July 10, 2008) – As a wildlife biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, he helped bolster populations of game animals across the state, from raccoons, to wild turkeys to waterfowl. But it wasn’t until he agreed to take on a fledgling program dedicated to the conservation of nongame wildlife — animals without an open season — that Randall C. Wilson found his true calling.

The dedication and tenacity that he put in to growing the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program from a staff of four in 1988 to more than 25 biologists 20 years later, and the conservation achievements that resulted, have earned Wilson the Commission’s most prestigious honor, the Thomas L. Quay Wildlife Diversity Award.

Wilson was presented with the award...
By NCWRC blogger on 10/31/2013 10:56 AM


Written by: Brad Howard

Have you seen this picture in an email or on Facebook lately?  We have! This photo has been passed around to numerous folks over the last month with claims that it has been taken in various locations across North Carolina. 

More recently, some attention was given to a few reports of “a black panther” in Stokes County. There were no photographs or other verifiable evidence to support those reports. While very rare, jaguars, leopards, the jaguarundi and even bobcats can have black coats but there has never been a documented occurrence of a melanistic phase (black) cougar in North America.

So, any report of a “black panther” or a “large black cat” is most likely mistaken identity since only the above-mentioned cats have a black phase and only one of those cats is native,...
By NCWRC blogger on 8/15/2013 11:55 AM
 By:  Al Kittredge

The August Wounded Warrior / Military Appreciation Day was held on Aug. 14 at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s John E. Pechmann Fishing Education Center, which is located on the west side of Fayetteville.

The turnout was a little sparse yesterday with about 35 or so people in attendance. The Commission and volunteers have been doing these events for the past five or six years on the second Wednesday of each month to show their appreciation to those who stand in harm’s way so the rest of us can live in this great country.

We’ve found that soldiers who suffer the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) enjoy the challenge of fly tying,which is offered at the beginning of the event.

A lot of kids were in attendance although those numbers are expected to taper once school...
By NCWRC blogger on 8/12/2013 8:02 AM
By: Matthew Godfrey, Biologist, N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission Sea Turtle Project  

The normal sea turtle nesting season in North Carolina runs from May through August and loggerhead sea turtles continue to visit sandy oceanside beaches to lay their eggs. So far this year, 1085 loggerhead nests have been observed and protected by citizen volunteers and cooperators from private,local, state and federal organizations, as part of the N.C. Sea Turtle Project, coordinated by biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.

There also have been almost two dozen nests laid by green turtles and one leatherback nest laid in Fort Fisher Recreation Area, which is located in New Hanover County. While the nesting season is close to being over, the hatching season is kicking into high gear. Sea turtle eggs need 50-60 days to incubate in the sand, before small hatchling sea turtles are produced and hatch out of the approximately 120 eggs in each sea turtle nest. The hatchlings dig together up through the sand and emerge on the beach surface in a large group, usually only at night, and scurry to the ocean to begin their journey around the North Atlantic.

...
By NCWRC blogger on 8/8/2013 3:09 PM
Results from a three-year fish attractor study are in and confirm what fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission have long suspected but never knew for certain until now — artificial structures constructed from synthetic materials are much better at attracting and holding fish over a long period of time than structures made of natural materials. 

Brian McRae, Piedmont Region Fisheries Supervisor, answers a few questions about the study and what it means for fisheries management in Piedmont reservoirs.

What was the purpose of the study?

The study and data analysis, which began in June 2008 and ended in August 2012, evaluated the effectiveness of four different types of fish attractors, in terms of how well they concentrated fish and how well they held up over a three-year duration. The Commission worked with cities of Greensboro and Burlington to complete the fish attractor study, which was funded through the Sport Fish Restoration Program

...
By NCWRC blogger on 7/15/2013 10:43 AM
The second Wednesday of each month ushers in a low budget but high impact program the folks at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s John E. Pechmann Fishing Education Center started over four years ago. We started out by opening the gate to a handful of Wounded Warriors who did not have a suitable place or the equipment to learn the mechanics of fly fishing. A little networking with Ft. Bragg’s Warrior Transition Battalion and Womack Army Medical Center revealed that any kind of fishing was great therapy for soldiers with obvious and not-so-obvious challenges related to the rigors of war. We have since expanded the invitation to anyone with a military connection to include active duty,reserves, National Guard, retired military, VA card holders or N.C. Handicapped Sportsmen and their family members. Show up between the...
By NCWRC blogger on 5/17/2013 9:18 AM
Don’t be that guy.

You know the one. He (or she) ticks off everyone in line to use a boat ramp by skipping in line, using more space than needed and being unpleasant to be around.

During the summer, some of our Boating Access Areas (We’re looking at you, Wrightsville Beach and Cross Point Landing) can become awfully busy. It’s hot. It’s crowded. And folks just want to get on the water.

We’ve rounded up a few tips to make the boating experience pleasant for everyone.

Pre-Launch at Home

·       File a float plan with a responsible person.

·       Make sure you have all required safety equipment on board.

·       Check the charge on fire extinguisher(s).

·       Check that your registration anddecal are up-to-date and your registration card is on board.

·       Make...

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