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Join NCPARC Today to Conserve Reptiles and Amphibians Tomorrow

Apr 12

Written by:
4/12/2013 2:38 PM  RssIcon

Are you the kind of person who enjoys listening to frogs call at night? Do you brake for turtles crossing the road? Do you see a snake on the ground and go running — for your camera?  

If you love reptiles and amphibians, you should become a member of North Carolina Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, or NCPARC. It’s free to join and with your free membership, you get to interact with a great group of individuals who, although they may come from different walks of life, professions and herpetological skill levels, have one thing in common: a love of reptiles and amphibians, collectively and affectionately known as “herps.” Their shared passion for herps, in fact, is matched only by their mutual desire to conserve and protect reptiles and amphibians in the Tar Heel state.  

While NCPARC emphasizes conserving endangered and threatened species, such as our three rattlesnake species and multiple turtles, members also focus on keeping common native animals common. After all, what nature-lovin’ person wants to go through life without seeing a box turtle sauntering through the woods in search of wild strawberries or an American toad sitting under a street lamp waiting for his supper to come buzzing by? 

Unless you’ve been hibernating under a rock for the last 20 or so years, you know that herps are in trouble. Habitat destruction, human antipathy, disease, climate change, invasive species and pollution have all played roles in their population declines in not only North Carolina, but worldwide.  We run the risk of seeing a lot of cool critters disappear from our landscape entirely if something’s not done. And you can be that something. 

By joining NCPARC, you can do something toward reversing these dismaying population trends. At NCPARC, we’re looking for folks to serve on one — or all — of three working groups:  

• Policy, Trade and Regulation, which addresses issues such as the illegal trade of reptiles and amphibians, and helps develop regulations and policies to conserve and protect these animals. 

• Research, Inventory, Monitoring and Management, which helps craft the Carolina Herp Atlas and the Calling Amphibians Survey Program, and develops focal species list rankings to help focus herp research efforts and projects. Group members are currently working on Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas (PARCAs), which will be similar to Important Bird Areas. 

• Education and Outreach, which coordinates and staffs outreach events and develops communications materials for the public on a wide variety of herp-related issues.    Meetings for each of these three working groups are held once every three months. Attendance to all meetings in encouraged but not required.  The North Carolina chapter is part of the national organization, PARC, which brought us the Year of the Snake for 2013.  

If you’re interested in finding out more about NCPARC, you can contact Wildlife Commission Biologist and NCPARC Coordinator Jeff Hall at jeff.hall@ncwildlife.org or 252-917-1683. Or visit the website, www.ncparc.org. You also can make plans to attend the 1st North Carolina Congress of Herpetology, which is a joint meeting between NCPARC and the N.C. Herpetological Society at the N.C. Zoo, April 19-21, 2013. More information about the meeting can be found on the NCPARC website.  Here’s to happy herping and we hope we see you at a NCPARC meeting soon

1 comment(s) so far...


Re: Join NCPARC Today to Conserve Reptiles and Amphibians Tomorrow

I love those Herps.

By Thaddeus N. Banks on   4/12/2013 9:13 PM

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