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May 10 Fishing Report

May 10

Written by:
5/10/2012 7:50 AM  RssIcon

Visit the Striped Bass Fishing page for more information on striped bass fishing in the Roanoke River.

The peak of the striped bass spawning season on the Roanoke River has likely passed, but plenty of fish remain on the spawning grounds and anglers are continuing to catch them.

Jeremy McCargo, Ben Ricks and Kevin Dockendorf, fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, sampled the river on Tuesday and collected approximately 600 fish. As has been the case most of the season, McCargo reported that the fish were scattered from the boat ramp past Troublefield Gut. Although the majority of the sample was smaller fish, the stripers ranged in size from 12 inches through 36 inches and included female stripers that McCargo said were “fresh fish” meaning they had yet to spawn.

Catch-and- release fishing has been good since the harvest season closed at the end of April. According to Commission creel clerk, Pete Kornegay, fishing this past weekend was particularly good, with Saturday and Sunday seeing excellent catches. Kornegay also reports that anglers continued to have success at Weldon Tuesday and Wednesday of this week.

Anglers fishing top water lures are having success in the early morning and late evening hours, whereas anglers fishing with live bait, flukes, bucktails and flies are having success throughout the day.

McCargo encourages anglers to help keep stripers alive to catch next year by following a few rules. From April 1 through June 30, anglers can use only a barbless hook or a lure with a single barbless hook (or the barb bent down) when fishing in inland waters of the Roanoke River upstream of the U.S. Hwy. 258 bridge. Also, anglers who are using top-water lures, or any artificial plug, should replace the two barbless hooks with a single barbless hook in the middle of the bait to reduce striper mortality.

Other ways to keep stripers alive are:

  • Keep the fish in the water when unhooking it
  • Use de-hookers whenever possible to help remove hooks quickly
  • Cut the line if the hook cannot be removed easily
  • Use a landing net made of rubber or knotless nylon, if necessary
  • Use small, non-offset circle hooks, preferably ones with the least amount of distance between the hook point and shank.

 

Other studies have shown that striped bass caught on small, barbless circle hooks are usually hooked in the jaw, which means they have a much greater chance of survival after being released than fish hooked in the throat or gut. Anglers can get free samples of Eagle Claw barbless circle hooks from Commission creel clerks working at the Weldon boat ramp.

Download and print a pocket-sized card on “Releasing Stripers Safely.”

Safety Note

 

High flows following periods of low flow dislodge limbs, logs and in some cases, trees from up river locations.  Boaters should take extreme caution when traveling on the water and be on the look-out for these floating hazards!  Similarly, extreme low flows can expose rock outcroppings and make many areas too shallow to access. 

For additional safety measures, the Commission urges boaters to file a float plan before getting on the river. Filling out a float plan and giving it to a reliable person before you leave the ramp can be a life-saving decision.

Check out the North Carolina Boating Checklist to be sure you’re complying with on-the-water rules and safety recommendations.

6 comment(s) so far...


Re: May 10 Fishing Report

worst season yet for shad and stripers it been going down hill for many years.need to get control of water flow the start of febuary this year last week of march they dumped 15 ft.in 3 days if we dont we going to kill weldon fishery.the haring are gone (wildlife commission must get control of flow) or we will lose the shad and stripers.

By stephenmyers on   5/11/2012 6:06 PM

Re: May 10 Fishing Report

All you folks screaming "Worst season ever" gave up too early. Those of us who are lucky enough to fish this river every day during the spawn have come to realize that every year is different. You're right... I had some customers in April that have caught their 100 in previous years who had 30 or 40 fish this year. Everybody forgot or gave up, but right now fishing is as good as I've ever seen it in my thirteen years of fishing here. I had a young man catch 103 by himself on a five hour trip last Sunday. We're all spoiled, guys. Twenty or thirty fish in a day's fishing is an awesome day. I leave here and fish Winyah Bay in S. C. where I would LOVE to be assured I could catch twenty a day.... of ANYTHING. And it's a great fishery as well. So my suggestion is realize every year is different and don't pass judgment till it's OVER..... I'm gonna be catching 100 a day the rest of the week.... come join me!!!

By Capt. Rod Thomas on   5/16/2012 4:59 PM

Re: May 10 Fishing Report

Worst season in 40+years. I seriously doubt ANYONE had a hundred fish day on the upper roanoke this year, which in previous years was a guarantee.

I have to agree with S.M. on the water flow being the problem. Every year that they dump huge amounts of water randomly the fishing is poor. When they don't flood the river, and the water-flow is somewhat natural, the fishing is Great.

What happened this year?? River was raised over flood stage early in the season and the fishing suffered.

Not a seasonal captain, not a yuppie, 54year Roanoke Rapids resident.

P.S. The fishing didn't pick in may, I Was there.

By P on   5/18/2012 10:50 PM

Re: May 10 Fishing Report

Do not advertise or promote a product or service.

1. Captain ponytail has just started fishing weldon within the last five years.
2. His link on your webpage(Do not advertise or promote a product or service.) and his blind(completely untrue) praise of how the NCWRC "saved" the depleted fishery at weldon does not help the perception of the NCWRC as a corrupt "good ole boy" cronieocracy, and further erodes public trust and faith in the NCWRC.
3. Ponytail eeks out fish behind the big rock(whether fish are there or not). So his clients only catch fish late in season when fish are stacked at rock. This past year ponytail was putting less than 10 fish in the boat per trip. ANY YOU GUYS ARE PUSHING HIM???? Push a captain who at least puts people on fish.
4. The herring have already been DESTROYED(not depleted) by erratic early water flow. The shad are in serious decline now and will soon be destroyed just like the herring. Once the shad are gone the stripers will go next.

THE NCWRC MUST CONTROL THE RIVER FROM THE START OF FEBRUARY UNTIL THE BEGINNING OF JUNE!!!!
The herring and shad are the KEYSTONE SPECIES of the roanoke river. Until they are both protected with the same rigorousness as the stripers the fishing will continue to get worse until eventually the shad and stripers will go the way of the herring.

TO FIX ANY PROBLEM YOU MUST FIRST ADMIT THE PROBLEM EXISTS!!! OUR FISHERY IS BEING DESTROYED!!!! STEP UP NCWRC, ADMIT THE PROBLEM THEN FIX IT!!!

By Alex Boswell on   6/3/2012 9:57 AM

Re: May 10 Fishing Report

To Anonymous: Thank you for your interest in the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. Please note that flows on the Roanoke River are regulated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Dominion Power for flood control, power production, water supply and recreation. There is a commitment to provide annual spawning flows for striped bass from April 1 – June 15. These “striped bass spawning flows” were established based on research conducted on the Roanoke River, and are contingent on availability of water in Kerr Reservoir.

In addition, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with numerous stakeholders, participates in a weekly water management conference call hosted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Consideration is given to current lake water levels, rainfall forecasts, and other issues (like spring spawning flows for striped bass, campground flooding and other recreational impacts) before decisions are made regarding flow releases. In addition, Commission staff not only evaluates the influence of flow and other factors on spawning success, but also on downstream nursery habitat through the summer and fall.

The Wildlife Commission already is helping to restore dwindling stocks of American shad on the Roanoke River. Each year, the Com¬mission, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, stocks the river with as many as 4 mil¬lion American shad fry. In addition, the Commission has enacted two regulations to help struggling stocks recover.

The first rule, effective July 2006, prohibits the taking and possession of blueback herring and alewife longer than 6 inches from the inland wa¬ters under the Commission’s jurisdiction in all coastal rivers and their tributaries up to the first impoundments of the main rivers. This protects spawning adults, which are typically longer than 6 inches; smaller herring, shorter than 6 inches and used as bait, are usually caught with cast nets in reservoirs above dams.

The second rule, which took effect July 1, 2008, decreases the daily creel limit of American shad from 10 fish to one fish per angler on the Roa¬noke River. This regulation will conserve the migratory American shad spawning stock during restoration efforts while allowing some harvest.

More information on the Commission’s work to help Roanoke River herring and shad stocks recover can be found in this pamphlet on herring and shad: 216.27.39.103/Portals/0/Fishing/documents/Herring_Shad_ID_guide_sm.pdf

By NCWRC blogger on   6/5/2012 9:41 AM

Re: May 10 Fishing Report

Not admitting the problem once again.

Herring and shad ARE THE KEYSTONE SPECIES. IF YOU DON'T PROTECT THEM YOU DON'T PROTECT STRIPERS.

It amazes me how a huge bureaucracy with massive funds still can't get something so simple.

IF YOU DROP WATER TEMPERATURES(by releasing huge amounts of water), EVERY EGG THAT WAS LAID IS KILLED. THAT IS WHY THE HERRING WERE DESTROYED BY IRRESPONSIBLE BUEROCRATS. THAT IS WHY THE SHAD WILL SOON BE DESTROYED BY IRRESPONSIBLE BUEROCRATES.


EXCUSES SAVE JOBS, NOT FISH. WE NOW KNOW WHAT THE NCWRC CARES ABOUT. Covering their own rear-ends.


NCWRC- I deem no public faith or confidence in the NCWRC. I also declare that the NCWRC needs to be cleaned out from top to bottom so that wildlife will become the only driving factor in the NCWRC. I demand a public hearing on the destruction of the roanoke fishery. Then the NCWRC wouldn't be able to deny the problem anymore, and might be forced to change a completely failed strategy.

By Alex Boswell on   6/6/2012 10:01 AM

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