Rank (0) Views 259 On Fri, Mar 28, 2014 8:08 AM, 22 days ago



LAWRENCEVILLE, N.C. (March 28, 2014) — The Nature and History Day at the Lost Town of Lawrenceville, scheduled for Saturday, March 29, from 1-4 p.m. has been postponed due to inclement weather.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources, along with the Greater Uwharrie Conservation Partnership, which is hosting the free event at the Uwharrie Trailhead on Hwy. 24/27, will announce a new date soon.

For more information about the Nature and History Day, visit N.C. Science Festival’s website and click on Piedmont-Triad region to see a list of events.

 


Rank (0) Views 231 On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 3:38 PM, 23 days ago



FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (March 27, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the N.C. Wildlife Federation Chapter of FISH (Fayetteville Increasing Sustainable Habitat), is sponsoring new monthly wildlife-related programs at the John E. Pechmann Fishing Education Center in Fayetteville.

The meetings, which are free and open to the public, will be held the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. The April 8 meeting will feature Carol Buie-Jackson, who chairs the Federation. She will present a “Creating a Friendly Wildlife Habitat in Your Landscape” program. Topics will include details of the basic requirements needed to create a wildlife-friendly setting within any property, whether it’s a home, business, school or place of worship.

“Carol’s enthusiasm, humor and knowledge of backyard wildlife habitats make this workshop ideal for backyard birders or anyone who loves and appreciates wildlife,” said Pec


Rank (0) Views 668 On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 10:51 AM, 24 days ago



BREVARD, N.C. (March 26, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is offering a women-only fly-fishing weekend on April 4-6 at the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education and Davidson River Campground in Transylvania County.

The fly-fishing weekend is open to women of all skill levels who want to learn more about fly fishing. The $125 registration fee covers instruction, fishing equipment and camping for the weekend, and lunch and snacks on Saturday. The 3-day program is being offered through the Wildlife Commission’s Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) program.

Participants can either camp at the campground or stay at a nearby hotel. While participants are encouraged to bring their own tents and equipment, a few tents will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The weekend is broken down into five skill-building sessions and participants will rotate through each session. In the stream ecology session, participants will search for aquatic organism


Rank (0) Views 955 On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 9:57 AM, 24 days ago



DUBLIN,  N.C. (March 26, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting on April 8 in Dublin to seek input in developing a management plan for the Whitehall Plantation Game Land in Bladen County.

The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Bladen Community College, located at 7418 N.C. Hwy. 41W.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on the Whitehall Plantation Game Land for the next 10 years. This game land, which totals 1,430 acres, includes the Cape Fear River floodplain and offers excellent examples of semi-permanent wetlands that provide critical habitat for many wildlife species. Some of the most popular game species include deer, turkey, waterfowl and small game. Whitehall Plantation Game Land is part of the Permit Hunting Opportunities Program that allows for managed participation and unique opportunities for special areas or species.  


Rank (0) Views 822 On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 9:24 AM, 24 days ago



GREENSBORO, N.C. (March 26, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, in partnership with students at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Academic Think Tank, is holding a contest to generate a new license plate design for the Commission’s Wildlife Diversity Program.

The Commission would like to update the current license plate logo, which features a northern cardinal and dogwood blossom, to a more striking image that reflects North Carolina’s native flora and fauna.

“The Commission hopes that this contest will bring attention and support to our Wildlife Diversity Program, which conducts research, conservation and monitoring work that benefits nongame wildlife — animals such as songbirds, sea turtles, eagles, salamanders, frogs, turtles and bats,” said Shannon Deaton, the Habitat Conservation program manager with the Commission. “Instead of the Commission developing an updated ima


Rank (0) Views 919 On Tue, Mar 25, 2014 1:13 PM, 25 days ago



ROCKINGHAM, N.C. (March 25, 2014) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting on April 3 in Rockingham to seek input in developing a management plan for the Pee Dee River Game Land in Richmond County. 

The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Hinson Lake Rotary Lodge, located on 152 Hinson Lake Road.

Wildlife Commission staff will use input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on the state-owned portions of the Pee Dee River Game Land for the next 10 years. This game land is located between Rockingham and Lilesville. Two tracts, encompassing approximately 2,270 acres, are popular for deer, turkey and small game hunting opportunities.  

“We are seeking input from all users of the Pee Dee River Game Land and others who are interested in how the property is managed,” said Lands Program Manager Isaac Harrold. “This meeting is not just for hunters and anglers. It is for wi


Rank (0) Views 3336 On Tue, Mar 25, 2014 8:55 AM, 25 days ago



MARION, N.C. (March 25, 2014) — Fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission are asking anglers to help stop the spread of the rusty crayfish — a destructive, non-native crayfish that has invaded the upper Catawba River in western North Carolina.

The rusty crayfish, which measures about 5 inches long, is native to the Ohio River watershed but can now be found in Canada and 17 other states, including North Carolina.

Anglers can identify the rusty crayfish from other native crayfish by a rust-colored spot on its sides, just in front of the tail. They also have black bands on the tips of their claws.

Wildlife Commission biologists first discovered the rusty crayfish in 2007 in the North Fork Catawba River, just upstream of Lake James in McDowell County. Since that time, the crustacean has expanded approximately 10 miles upstream in the North Fork Catawba River and 11 miles upstream in the Catawba River, according to TR Russ, an aquatic wi


Rank (0) Views 687 On Mon, Mar 24, 2014 8:44 AM, 26 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 24, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will host a Practical Wildlife Habitat Management seminar at its Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education in Raleigh on April 24.

The 6-9 p.m. seminar is free, but pre-registration is required.

Presented by the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA), this interactive workshop is designed for landowners and sportsmen who want to improve their properties to benefit wildlife and conserve habitat.

“This seminar is specifically geared toward the non-professional,” said Guy Gardner, the presenter with QDMA. “We will discuss techniques to implement a cost-effective, practical habitat management program allowing anyone to improve the quality of their property for the benefit of wildlife.”

The seminar will consist of:

An overview of wildlife habitat requirements;

Advice on developing a wildlife habitat management plan;

Information on t


Rank (0) Views 693 On Mon, Mar 24, 2014 8:22 AM, 26 days ago



HOLLISTER, N.C. (March 24, 2014) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting in Hollister on April 10 to seek input in developing a management plan for the Upper Tar Game Land Complex (UTGLC), located in Franklin, Halifax, Nash and Warren counties.  

The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m., at the Chief W.R. Richardson Tribal Complex, Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe, located at 39021 Hwy. 561, in Hollister.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on the Upper Tar Game Land Complex for the next 10 years. The UTGLC consists of the Brinkleyville, Embro, Sandy Creek and Shocco Creek game lands. These game lands are located between Warrenton, Littleton and Castalia in the Fishing Creek watershed. The Wildlife Commission manages 26 tracts encompassing 19,176 acres on these game lands that are popular among hunters for deer, turkey and small game hunting opportunities. Addi


Rank (0) Views 1896 On Fri, Mar 21, 2014 4:00 PM, 29 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 21, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a radio-collared red wolf that was recently found dead. The federally protected red wolf was found with an apparent gunshot wound on March 11, southwest of Creswell, in Washington County.  

This is the second red wolf death of 2014 resulting from a suspected gunshot. A total of 14 wild red wolves are known to have died in 2013, including three struck and killed by vehicles, one died incidental to otherwise legal activities, and nine were confirmed or suspected gunshot deaths. The remaining wolf death for 2013 is undetermined.

The red wolf in North Carolina is protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as an experimental, non-essential population. This means that relaxed regulations allow landowners to kill a red wolf if it attacks their livestock or p


Rank (0) Views 4723 On Fri, Mar 21, 2014 11:25 AM, 29 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 21, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will open approximately 1,000 miles of hatchery-supported trout waters in 25 western counties at 7 a.m. on April 5. The season will run through Feb. 28, 2015.

While fishing on hatchery-supported trout waters, anglers can harvest a maximum of seven trout per day, with no minimum size limits or bait restrictions.

Streams and rivers in the Wildlife Commission’s Hatchery-Supported Trout Waters Program are marked by green-and-white signs. Commission staff stocks these waters from March until August every year, depending on the individual stream. A list of numbers and species stocked by month and county can be found on the Commission’s website. Many of these waters are stocked monthly, although some heavily fished waters are stocked more frequently. 

Commission personnel will stock nearly 907,000 trout, with 96 percent of the stocked fish averaging 10 inches in length and




LAWRENCEVILLE, N.C. (March 21, 2014) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the Greater Uwharrie Conservation Partnership, is hosting a Nature and History Day at the Lost Town of Lawrenceville on March 29 from 1-4 p.m.

The free event, which will be held at the Uwharrie Trailhead on Hwy. 24/27 approximately 10 miles west of Troy, will offer activities for nature enthusiasts of all ages. Activities will include a short hike where natural resource professionals will be stationed, providing information and answering questions about wildlife, native forest ecosystems,prescribed fires and invasive species.

An archeologist from the U.S. Forest Service also will be on site discussing the rediscovery of the lost town of Lawrenceville, which served as the county seat for Montgomery County in the mid-1800s, before the seat was moved to the current location in Troy.

Staff will be giving away informational handouts on wildlife conservation, longleaf pine

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