Rank (0) Views 6352 On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 4:13 PM, 734 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 19, 2012) —A white-tailed deer born and raised in captivity in Pennsylvania has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), prompting the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission to implement restrictions regarding importing deer heads from Pennsylvania. As a result, North Carolina taxidermists no longer can accept full deer heads for mounts from Pennsylvania and must inform wildlife officers if they receive one.

In addition, anyone bringing a deer from Pennsylvania, or the 20 other states or two Canadian provinces where CWD has been detected, must follow North Carolina processing and packaging regulations.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). It is a progressive, fatal disease that often results in altered behavior as a result of small changes in the brain of affected animals.

There has been no documented case of humans contracting CWD or a CWD-like disease from deer. The Wo


Rank (0) Views 3851 On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 11:25 AM, 735 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 19, 2012) — Prompted by requests from people unable to attend the N.C. State Fair in Raleigh, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and Neuse Sport Shop announced today an agreement to expand sales of a new wildlife diversity T-shirt from the N.C. State Fair in Raleigh to Neuse Sport Shop’s store in Kinston as well as its online store, www.nssnc.com.

The T-shirt’s front features the smallmouth bass art from this year’s State Fair button leaping across the agency’s wildlife logo, while the back features all32 previous State Fair buttons dating back to the original squirrel button in1981.

T-shirts are available in youth and adult sizes. Prices are $12 for youth shirts, $15 for adult shirts.

Fabrication of the T-shirts was paid entirely by Neuse Sport Shop. The initial set of 700 T-shirts donated to the Wildlife Commission are being sold at the Commission’s State Fair tent, where all proceeds from


Rank (0) Views 4041 On Thu, Oct 18, 2012 12:59 PM, 735 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 18, 2012) —The Home From The Hunt™ safety campaign of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission states that too many hunting injuries come from ignoring basic firearms safety.

“Treat every firearm as if it were loaded and always point the muzzle in a safe direction,” said Travis Casper, state hunter education coordinator. “Don’t rest a barrel on your foot or lean on it — that’s not a safe direction.”


The four basic rules of firearms safety are:
Always point a firearm in a safe direction. 
Treat every firearm as if it were loaded and never assume a firearm is unloaded.
Keep your finger out of the trigger guard and off the trigger until ready to shoot.
Be sure of your target and what is beyond your target.

“Throughout the various hunting seasons, the majority of folks are responsible and safe,” Casper said. “North Carolina ha


Rank (0) Views 5548 On Thu, Oct 18, 2012 8:42 AM, 736 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 18, 2012) — Somebody’s seriously jonesing for some venison.

Deer hunters and venison connoisseurs alike have filled the pre-registration enrollment for a repeat of a deer-processing clinic scheduled for Nov. 8 in Raleigh, prompting the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and the Quality Deer Management Association to coordinate a third clinic on deer processing the following week.

The Wildlife Commission is accepting registrations for a “Deer Processing, From Field to Freezer” clinic to be held on Nov. 13, from 6:30-9 p.m., at the Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education in Raleigh. This will repeat the standing-room only deer-processing clinics held on Sept. 11 and scheduled for Nov. 8. The clinic is free.

Guy Gardner and Howard Walters, both from the Cape Fear River Branch of Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA), will provide information on field dressing, processing techniques and taxidermy. They also w




RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 16, 2012) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with other state fish and wildlife agencies, joined the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this year in celebrating the 75thanniversary of the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (WSFR), one of the most successful and enduring conservation partnerships ever undertaken.

The “WSFR 75 – It’s Your Nature” celebration marked the 75thanniversary of the passage of the Wildlife Restoration Act, also known as the Pittman-Robertson Act, which authorized an 11 percent federal excise tax on sporting arms, ammunition and archery equipment, and a 10 percent tax on handguns. The Department of Treasury collects the excise taxes, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dispenses money among state fish and wildlife agencies to fund projects that improve hunter access and hunting opportunities.

A similar funding mechanism to increase fishing and boating opportunities w


Rank (0) Views 1892 On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 2:52 PM, 737 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (October 16, 2012) Download the PDF below for the November 8, 2012 Commission Meeting Notice.

November 8, 2012 Commission Meeting Notice (PDF)

Visit Meetings / Actions in the About section for more information. 


Rank (0) Views 2497 On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 9:46 AM, 738 days ago



POPLAR BRANCH, N.C. (Oct 16, 2012) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has completed renovations on the Poplar Branch Boating Access Area and it is now open to the public.

The site, which gives boaters access to the Currituck Sound, has two new ramps, floating and fixed docks, a new bulkhead wall and a newly paved parking area. It was paid for through Sportfish Restoration Fund and motorboat registration receipts.

“We get folks fishing for bass and white perch, but we mainly get duck hunters in Currituck County at this site,” said Ric Wright, a construction project manager with the Commission. “We also get a lot of boaters here, vacationing in this area of the state.”

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission manages more than 200 free boating access areas across the state. Go online for an interactive map of all the sites. 


Rank (0) Views 3835 On Thu, Oct 11, 2012 4:54 PM, 742 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C.(Oct. 11, 2012)— It’s not deep fried. It’s not caked with powdered sugar either. But the new wildlife diversity T-shirt making its debut at the N.C. State Fair makes for a pretty sweet collectible.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission partnered with Neuse Sport Shop in Kinston to develop a new Wildlife Commission T-shirt for sale in the agency’s Wild Store at this year’s State Fair. The T-shirt’s front features the smallmouth bass art from this year’s State Fair button leaping over the agency’s wildlife logo,while the back features all 32 previous State Fair buttons dating back to the original squirrel button in 1981.

T-shirts are available in youth and adult sizes. Prices are $12 for youth shirts, $15 for adult shirts.

Fabrication of 700 T-shirts was paid entirely by Neuse Sport Shop in Kinston, which also agreed to donate all proceeds from T-shirts sold at the State Fair to the Comm


Rank (0) Views 4315 On Wed, Oct 10, 2012 8:49 AM, 744 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 10, 2012) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will have a family-friendly presence at the 2012 North Carolina State Fair, with plenty of interactive opportunities for all ages.

This year’s exhibit celebrates the 75th anniversary of the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR) Program.

Visitors to the Wildlife Commission’s State Fair tent can experience hands-on activities, such as the Hunter Education Program’s popular air rifle target range, wild turkey calling with box calls, a “picture yourself as a sportsman” photo booth, and the Sensory Safari. The Commission’s mobile aquarium also will be on display, featuring largemouth bass, bluegill and longnose gar in a “coastal river” tank, and smallmouth bass, brook trout and brown trout in a “mountain reservoir” tank.

The exhibit highlights dynamic conservation activities, such as the sta


Rank (0) Views 7644 On Mon, Oct 08, 2012 5:15 PM, 745 days ago



MOORESVILLE, N.C. (Oct. 8, 2012) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will hold a public input meeting at Lake Norman High School on Oct.16 from 7 to 9 p.m., to discuss the Lake Norman striped bass fishery.

Commission biologists will present an overview of the lake’s striped bass fishery, provide information on the status of the population, and discuss the current management of the fishery, as well as potential future strategies to improve the fishery. 

They also will review the striped bass kills that have occurred over the last few summers and outline options that can be implemented to reduce the frequency and magnitude of fish kills.

During the meeting, anglers will be encouraged to ask questions and provide comments. 

“While the meeting will focus on the lake’s striped bass fishery, we encourage all anglers who fish on Lake Norman to attend the meeting and provide input,” said Brian McRae, Piedmon


Rank (0) Views 4090 On Thu, Oct 04, 2012 10:36 AM, 750 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 4, 2012) — More people are hurt falling from tree stands than any other type of hunting accidents, yet tree stand-related injuries are almost always avoidable.


Last deer hunting season, officers with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission investigated two fatalities and seven injuries that were related to tree stand use. There have been two fatalities related to tree stand use so far this season.

The Wildlife Commission’s Home From The Hunt™ safety campaign has made tree stand safety a top priority in North Carolina for the 2012-13 hunting season. Hunter Education Program instructors are emphasizing proper use of tree stands and elevated hunting platforms in workshops, programs and events across the state.

“Following some basic guidelines can prevent injuries and won’t interfere with a successful hunt,” said Travis Casper, the state hunter education coordinator. “Maintain three points o


Rank (0) Views 3773 On Tue, Oct 02, 2012 3:51 PM, 751 days ago



SPRUCE PINE, N.C. (Oct. 2, 2012) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has postponed a trout stocking in the North Toe River in Spruce Pine until Oct. 12 so it will coincide with the start of a research project being conducted on the river.

The original stocking had been scheduled for this week as part of the Commission’s Delayed Harvest Trout Waters Program.

The Commission is collaborating with N.C. State University to research stocked trout in the North Toe River and other Delayed Harvest Trout Waters to improve management of stocked-trout resources. Biologists expect to initiate the research on the North Toe early next week.

“By delaying the trout stocking until next week, N.C. State University researchers will be able to finish installation of some trout-monitoring equipment that could not be installed due to recent heavy rains,” said Doug Besler, mountain region fisheries supervisor.“We recognize the temporary inconve

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