Rank (0) Views 3380 On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (July 30, 2010) – The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is inviting citizens to provide input on regular waterfowl hunting seasons through an online comment system on the Commission’s website beginning next week. Regular waterfowl seasons begin in late September and include various seasons for ducks, Canada geese, snow geese, brant and tundra swans. Beginning next week, citizens can comment on proposed dates for the seasons, by going to www.ncwildlife.org and clicking on “Regular Waterfowl Season Comments.” Public comments will be accepted until Aug. 16. The Commission’s website, www.ncwildlife.org, will also provide the federal frameworks from which seasons may be selected, a direct link to a map of North Carolina’s Canada goose hunt zones, and a link to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2010 Status of Waterfowl video. For more information on migratory game birds in North Carolina, vi


Rank (0) Views 3287 On Tue, Feb 15, 2011 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Feb. 15, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will open the entire Roanoke River Management Area to striped bass harvest from March 1 through April 30.  The Roanoke River Management Area includes the Roanoke River and tributaries from Roanoke Rapids Lake Dam downstream to Albemarle Sound, including the Cashie, Middle and Eastmost rivers.     

The daily creel limit within the Roanoke River Management Area is two striped bass per person. The minimum length limit is 18 inches, and no striped bass between 22 and 27 inches can be possessed at any time. Only one striped bass larger than 27 inches can be included in the daily creel limit.

Anglers are required to use a single barbless hook or a lure with a single barbless hook when fishing in the upper Roanoke River from April 1 through June 30. The upper Roanoke River is defined as the main river channel and all tributaries, upstream from the U.S.


Rank (0) Views 3903 On Thu, Jul 29, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 29, 2010)  - The North Carolina Inland Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Regulations Digest for the 2010-2011 seasons will be available online at www.ncwildlife.org on Aug. 1.

Hardcopies of the digest will be available in mid-August from wildlife service agents, many of which are located in bait and tackle shops and larger sporting good stores.


Rank (0) Views 3388 On Wed, Jul 28, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago




RALEIGH, N.C. (July 28, 2010) – Use of crossbows in North Carolina is now considered a legal hunting method that may be used by licensed hunters anytime bow-and-arrow hunting is allowed.

This change in hunting regulations has prompted an increase in crossbow sales. What has not changed are the requirements for legally purchasing a crossbow in North Carolina [reference state statutes N.C.G.S. 14-402, N.C.G.S. 14-403.

State law requires that anyone buying or otherwise receiving a crossbow in North Carolina first obtain a pistol permit from the sheriff’s office in their county of residence or hold a valid concealed handgun permit. Questions about obtaining pistol permits and issuance of concealed handgun permits should be directed to the local sheriff’s department.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission does not regulate the sale or purchase of firearms and crossbows.


Rank (0) Views 3466 On Wed, Jul 28, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 27, 2010) — At only 7 years old, Curtis Markham is an avid outdoorsman who loves to hunt and fish and now, thanks to Neuse Sport Shop in Kinston, Curtis will be able to hunt and fish in North Carolina without ever purchasing a license.

Curtis, who is from South Mills, was one of three young anglers to take home lifetime licenses as part of a statewide drawing for participants in 46 kids’ “Fish for Fun events,” which were held in May and June in celebration of National Fishing and Boating Week 2010. He won the grand prize, a unified lifetime sportsman/coastal recreational fishing license, valued at $450.

Curtis’ license gives him statewide hunting privileges, including hunting for big game, hunting on game lands and waterfowl hunting, as well as fishing privileges in all public waters from the mountains to the coast.

Curtis’ love for the outdoors began at age 3 after his uncles took him fishing for


Rank (0) Views 3478 On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 21, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has extended the deadline for nominations for its annual Diedrick Small Game award.

Nominations for this year’s award are due August 31.

The awards are given to an individual and an organization whose actions significantly and positively impact North Carolina’s small game populations, including Northern bobwhite, ruffed grouse, squirrel, and rabbit.

Winners receive a plaque and formal recognition at the October Commission meeting and appreciation for their efforts on behalf of North Carolina small game wildlife species.

In the individual category, past award winners were landowners who improved and integrated small game habitat into their forestry or farming operations. In the organization category, past award winners included corporations, government agencies, and non-government organizations whose actions improved small game habitat. Past organizational winners included Pe


Rank (0) Views 3418 On Thu, Jul 15, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 15, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission voted on July  7 to take to statewide public hearings 23 proposed changes to the state’s hunting, trapping and fishing regulations for the 2011-2012 seasons.

Adding five streams to the public trout waters program and removing hunting and trapping restrictions at Cowan’s Ford Waterfowl Refuge in Lincoln, Mecklenburg and Gaston counties are among the regulation changes. The public can provide comments online beginning in early August and at any of the nine public hearings in September.

For full text of the proposed regulations changes, visit Proposed Regulations for 2011-2012 Hunting, Trapping and Fishing Seasons.

Public hearings begin at 7 p.m. The schedule for the 2011-2012 hunting, trapping and fishing seasons is below:


DATE

DISTRICT

CITY

LOCATION


Tue, Sept. 7

4

Dublin

Bladen Community College


Wed, Sept. 8

5

Pittsboro


Rank (0) Views 3697 On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 12, 2010) – The proposed hunting and trapping rule changes approved by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in March 2009 but delayed for legislative review will go into effect on Aug. 1, 2010.

Along with these delayed rules, hunting, trapping and fishing rules proposed for the 2010-11 seasons, approved by the Commission in March 2010, go into effect on Aug. 1.

Fifteen hunting and trapping proposals were referred to the General Assembly by the North Carolina Rules Review Commission in April 2009 in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. As a result, the rule changes could not take effect until they were reviewed by the legislature, which convened in short session on May 12 of this year. Legislators had 31 days to propose bills disapproving the rules.

Four bills were introduced disapproving the Commission’s rules. Because none of the bills was enacted into law, the following changes will take effect Aug. 1, 2010:
Require


Rank (0) Views 3473 On Thu, Jul 08, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 8, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has approved the season dates for dove and other webless migratory game birds, as well as September seasons for Canada geese and teal.

Each year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides frameworks from which to choose the seasons and the Commission selects the actual dates within these guidelines. The Commission allowed public input on the seasons throughout June on its website, www.ncwildlife.org.

The 2010–11 seasons for webless migratory game birds and waterfowl early seasons are:
Mourning and white-winged dove: Sept. 4 – Oct 9; Nov. 22 – Nov. 27; and Dec. 18 – Jan. 14; daily bag of 15 and possession limit of 30
King and clapper rails: Sept. 4 – Nov. 12; daily bag of 15 and possession limit of 30
Sora and Virginia rails: Sept. 4 – Nov. 12; daily bag of 25 and possession limit of 25
Gallinule and moorhens: Sept. 4 – N


Rank (0) Views 4134 On Wed, Jul 07, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 7, 2010) – In action today, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously endorsed a letter from Chairman Steve Windham to the Mountain Island Lake Marine Commission strongly opposing a lake management plan that would sharply limit boats and boater access.

Mountain Island Lake Marine Commission proposes a ban of boats longer than 22 feet and pontoon boats longer than 26 feet. Boaters also would have to purchase either an annual or one-day permit to access the lake.

“This proposal raises profound concerns about the ability of citizens to utilize a public trust resource,” said Gordon Myers, executive director of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “Consider that public trust rights are for the use and benefit of the people – and include the right to navigate, swim, hunt, fish and enjoy all recreational activities in the watercourses of North Carolina. The waters of the Catawba River, of which Mountain I


Rank (0) Views 3208 On Wed, Jul 07, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



PITTSBORO, N.C. (July 7, 2010) – The Wildlife Commissioners of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission voted today to change the location for its District 5 public hearing on Sept. 8.

The annual public hearing will be held in the auditorium of Central Carolina Community College, 764 West Street, Pittsboro. Previously, the District 5 hearings had been held in the second floor courtroom in the Civil Courts Building, Graham.

District 5 includes Rockingham, Guilford, Randolph, Caswell, Alamance, Chatham, Lee, Person, Orange, Granville and Durham counties

A series of nine public hearings across the state solicits comments on proposed changes to hunting, fishing and trapping regulations. All hearings begin at 7 p.m. After the hearings and a review of all comments, the Wildlife Commissioners then vote whether or not to adopt the proposed rules.

This year’s hearings are also the first to be held in September since the Commission adjusted its rulemaking cycle.&n


Rank (0) Views 3791 On Thu, Sep 30, 2010 12:00 AM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 30, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the North Carolina Wildlife Federation and the North Carolina chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, has unveiled a green-growth initiative that encourages wildlife-friendly practices for new and existing residential developments.

The Wildlife Friendly Development Certification program recognizes residential land developers who promote the conservation of wildlife habitat and use environmentally sound construction practices in their developments.

Developments that are certified as wildlife friendly incorporate features that protect existing habitats by providing food, water, cover and places to raise young, the four components of suitable wildlife habitat. Once certified, these developments can be marketed to homeowners who value the protection of natural resources.

To acquire certification, developers work closely with the staffs from the Commission and Federation

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