Nominations Sought for 2011 Wildlife Conservation Award

RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 16, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is seeking nominations through Jan. 30 for the sixth annual Thomas L. Quay Award.   The award, the Commission’s most prestigious, recognizes individuals who make outstanding contributions to wildlife diversity in North Carolina and who are considered leaders in wildlife resources conservation.  Anyone interested in nominating someone for the award must submit a nomination form and a detailed explanation of the nominee’s contributions to wildlife conservation. The explanation is limited to two pages (8 ½ x 11-inch paper, with 1-inch margins, single spaced and 12-point font.) Submissions that exceed the 2-page limit will be disqualified and returned to the nominator. Download the nomination form and submit nominations by: E-mail to martha.homovec@ncwildlife.org; Mail to N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, Division of Wildlife Manageme
Monday, November 15, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (10279)/Comments (0)/

Wildlife Commission Pledges Support for East Fork Headwaters

RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 4, 2010) – The Commissioners of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously passed a resolution Thursday, pledging the agency’s support for the management and stewardship of the East Fork Headwaters, an 8,000 acre tract of biologically diverse land in Transylvania County. During meetings on Wednesday and Thursday, the Commission agreed to manage the land if the Conservation Fund raises the money to purchase it. The Conservation Fund, a nonprofit land protection organization, is under contract to purchase the East Fork Headwaters Tract for $33 million. “This land is highly desirable for protection and public use, and is truly multipurpose,” said Gordon Myers, executive director of the Commission. “The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission supports The Conservation Fund’s effort to effectuate long-term conservation of this valuable resource.” The East Fork Headwaters tract is the largest
Wednesday, November 3, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (8164)/Comments (0)/

Seminar Looks at the Human Dimension in Wildlife Conservation

RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 14, 2010) – Human dimensions in wildlife conservation – the “people aspect” of nature – will be the topic for the Oct. 27th Fisheries and Wildlife Seminar at the Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education. The seminar, titled “Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management: What is it and Why Should You Care?” will be presented by Dr. Nils Peterson and Kerry Linehan at 4 p.m. following a networking session with refreshments, which begins at 3:30 p.m. An assistant professor at N.C. State University, Dr. Peterson researches the relationships of human actions and natural systems. He examines how factors from land use policies to household dynamics affect the environment and endangered wildlife populations. He will relate how this research and its applications can benefit conservation measures. As a human dimensions biologist for the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, Linehan conducts and coor
Wednesday, October 13, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9498)/Comments (0)/

Wildlife Friendly Development Certification Program Unveiled

RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 30, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the North Carolina Wildlife Federation and the North Carolina chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, has unveiled a green-growth initiative that encourages wildlife-friendly practices for new and existing residential developments. The Wildlife Friendly Development Certification program recognizes residential land developers who promote the conservation of wildlife habitat and use environmentally sound construction practices in their developments. Developments that are certified as wildlife friendly incorporate features that protect existing habitats by providing food, water, cover and places to raise young, the four components of suitable wildlife habitat. Once certified, these developments can be marketed to homeowners who value the protection of natural resources. To acquire certification, developers work closely with the staffs from the Commission and Federation
Wednesday, September 29, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (13135)/Comments (0)/

Delayed-Harvest Trout Waters Open Oct. 1

RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 24, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will implement delayed-harvest regulations on 22 trout waters in 15 western North Carolina counties on Oct. 1. Before Oct. 1, hatchery-supported regulations apply to these waters. Under delayed-harvest regulations, no trout can be harvested or possessed from these waters between Oct. 1, 2010, and one half-hour after sunset on June 3, 2011. No natural bait is allowed, and anglers can fish only with single-hook, artificial lures. An artificial lure is defined as a fishing lure that neither contains nor has been treated with any substance that attracts fish by the sense of taste or smell. Continued drought conditions in western North Carolina may result in reducing the number of trout scheduled for stocking in delayed-harvest trout waters in October. Staff will be assessing all the delayed-harvest waters from now until Oct. 1 to determine if reduced stockings are necessary. “All
Thursday, September 23, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (11156)/Comments (0)/

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