All about that (Striped) Bass

All about that (Striped) Bass

Striped Bass are anadromous fish, meaning that the adults migrate from the ocean into freshwater rivers and creeks to reproduce. It’s a team effort to manage these species: they are managed by multiple agencies and commissions, depending on where they are in their migration cycle. Read more...

Wednesday, August 9, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (4612)/Comments (0)/

Five things to know about trout fishing in North Carolina

Five things to know about trout fishing in North Carolina

Trout fishing is a big deal in North Carolina! Here are five cool facts about trout fishing in our state:

1.      It brings in money and jobs. Trout fishing is a huge economic benefit to our state. In 2014, it brought in an estimated $383 million and supported 3,600 jobs each year.

2.      NC has more native populations of Brook Trout than anywhere in the Southeast! The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) carefully manages these populations, and also . . .

Thursday, May 18, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (12317)/Comments (1)/

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

A $200 bounty on hellbenders? Say it’s not so.

“That is a rumor and absolutely untrue,” said Lori Williams, a Wildlife Diversity biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “Furthermore, the Eastern hellbender is listed as a species of special concern in North Carolina. Harming, harassing, collecting or killing one is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can result in a fine and up to 120 days in jail.”

Hellbenders are one of the largest salamanders found in North Carolina, averaging 16-17 inches long but can grow up to 24 inches long.

Also called the “water dog,” “snot otter,” “Alleghany alligator,” among other names, the hellbender is a harmless, giant aquatic salamander found in fast-moving, clean mountain streams in . . .
 

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Tuesday, May 9, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (21629)/Comments (0)/

I see smoke! Are the game lands on fire?

I see smoke! Are the game lands on fire?

Most likely, yes. We’re now in the “prescribed burn” season—late winter and spring.  The Commission uses controlled, low-level flames to restore and maintain wildlife habitat on most of the 2 million acres of state game lands used by hunters, anglers and wildlife watchers.

In North Carolina, prescribed burning is commonly conducted between January and March, when most trees are less active metabolically. Repeated burns conducted during the spring growing season eventually kill hardwood sprouts, allowing a diversity of native grasses, herbs and wildflowers to develop. These herbaceous plants are typically more valuable than hardwood sprouts for food and cover for wildlife. Without prescribed burns, wildlife in some habitats may experience low reproduction and eventual displacement. READ MORE

 

Friday, February 10, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (12463)/Comments (2)/

Why Not Open Wild Turkey Season Earlier?

Why Not Open Wild Turkey Season Earlier?

Each year, hunters hear turkeys gobbling prior to the opening of the spring gobbler season and express interest in opening the season earlier. As a result, managers are often pressured to set earlier opening dates for spring gobbler seasons. But, according to Kennamer’s research published in 2006, “the consequences of early hunting seasons may create scenarios that harm turkeys and turkey hunting more than hunters realize.” The whole premise of a spring gobbler season — of it being biologically sound to hunt gobblers in the spring — is based upon harvesting birds after breeding has occurred. Gobblers play no part in nesting or brood rearing. Their role is breeding. After breeding, they are not vital to the incubation and brood-rearing phases of reproduction and many can be harvested without negatively impacting the population. The onset of nesting is widely cited as an important, biologically based criterion for setting opening dates for spring...
Thursday, April 2, 2015/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (9660)/Comments (0)/

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