Boating and Hiking Activities Suspended at Two Jackson County Lakes

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 22, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is alerting boaters, anglers and hikers that Duke Energy is lowering water levels at Tanassee Creek and Wolf Creek lakes to facilitate inspection procedures. Unexpected rapid increases in water flow, due to water releases, make it unsafe for hikers and anglers to be in areas below the dams. Additionally, water levels in both lakes were lowered enough to eliminate the use of the lakes’ public boat ramps. Levels are expected to drop even further before the repair work is completed. Work is expected to take a number of weeks. For status updates, visit Duke Energy’s website, www.duke-energy.com/lakes/nantahala/nantahala-lake-levels.asp, or call 800-829-5253 and choose option 5. 
Monday, June 21, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (11253)/Comments (0)/

July 4 is Free Fishing Day in All Public Waters

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 21, 2010) – Fish for free in all public waters — including coastal waters — on July 4 from 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m. While everyone, residents and non-residents, can fish in public waters on this date without a license, all other fishing regulations, such as length and daily possession limits, as well as bait and tackle restrictions, apply. Authorized by the N.C. General Assembly and started in 1994, North Carolina’s annual free fishing day, which always falls on July 4, was created to promote the sport of fishing.   The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission manages recreational fisheries, stocks fish, and provides free access to fishing sites across the state.  And, while many sport fisheries in North Carolina are self-sustaining, the Commission annually stocks a variety of fish in public, inland waters — from trout in the mountains to striped bass in Piedmont reservoirs and channel
Sunday, June 20, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (10917)/Comments (0)/

Green Planning Program Receives Grant

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 17, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has received a $200,000 grant to expand its Green Growth Toolbox, a tool designed to help communities implement habitat-friendly practices into development plans. The grant will pay for the integration of the Wildlife Action Plan – the Commission’s blueprint for enhancing and conserving the state’s fish and wildlife species and their habitats – and its priorities into local land use planning. The Commission will partner with the North Carolina Coastal Land Trust, Sustainable Sandhills, and the Land of Sky Regional Council to offer Green Growth Toolbox technical guidance to counties and municipalities in most areas of the state. Currently, the Green Growth Toolbox training is only offered in the Piedmont region. ”We are thrilled to have received this funding from the Wildlife Conservation Society,” said Jacquelyn Wallace, Urban Wildlife Biol
Wednesday, June 16, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9759)/Comments (0)/

Residents Can Take Steps to Avoid Conflict with Bears

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 17, 2010) – With the rise of media reports across the state about black bear interactions with humans, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding citizens that they can take a few simple steps to avoid conflict with bears. Residents should avoid feeding bears, whether intentionally or unintentionally, as it accustoms the bear to human food. Feeding a bear rewards it for approaching people and their homes and makes it more likely to approach again. While black bears are rarely aggressive toward people, they can become bold when accustomed to feeding on human-provided foods, such as garbage and bird seed. Often, they lose their fear of people, and bears that are too comfortable with people are more likely to cause problems. In addition, if a bear visits a residential area, people should remain calm and leave it alone. A crowd will unnerve the bear, causing it to act unpredictably. Crowds should disperse and allow the bear to move on undist
Wednesday, June 16, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9667)/Comments (0)/

UNC-TV ‘North Carolina Lens’ Program to Focus on Agency Photo Contest

RALEIGH, N.C. (June 11, 2010) – The UNC-TV special program “North Carolina Lens” will feature Greg Jenkins, editor of the national-award-winning monthly Wildlife in North Carolina magazine, and its annual photo contest.   Also featured is Mike Dunn, a naturalist and nature photographer, who works as senior manager of outreach with the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. Dunn explains what makes a good nature photograph, the characteristics of wildlife subjects and how you can take great photos. The segment will be broadcast on June 24 at 9:30 p.m. and repeated June 27 at noon; July 11 at 10:30 p.m. and July 17 at 3:30 a.m. For additional information, go to www.unctv.org.   “This is our sixth annual photo competition and it has become quite the hallmark of the magazine,” said Jenkins. “Beautiful nature photos from North Carolina have inspired generations of people to be better stewards of our precious nat
Thursday, June 10, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9531)/Comments (0)/

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