Help! I found a wild animal!

Help! I found a wild animal!

Would you know what to do if you find an injured wild animal? Do you know who to call for wildlife problems or concerns? The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission receives thousands of calls each year on these kinds of issues, so we thought we’d share a few frequently asked questions that come up in the spring and our best advice for each scenario. I found a fawn! Female deer hide their fawns while they feed, returning several times a day to care for them. People find these fawns and worry that they have been orphaned, but most of the time, they’re not. Unless the fawn is in distress (calling incessantly, visibly injured, or found next to a dead doe), we advise people to leave it in place and check back in 24 hours. If it’s still in the same spot the next day, call a licensed fawn rehabilitator for guidance. I found a bird that can’t fly! In the spring, people often call to report a bird fluttering... (click blog title to read more)
Monday, April 17, 2017/Author: Naomi Avissar/Number of views (5508)/Comments (0)/

“Herps” in the House at Reptile and Amphibian Day this Saturday

“Herps” in the House at Reptile and Amphibian Day this Saturday

It is going to be a hopping, slithering, slinking kind of day this Saturday at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences in downtown Raleigh when the 23rd Annual Reptile and Amphibian Day kicks off at 9 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. The free event, which draws thousands of people each year, highlights the biology, ecology and conservation needs of reptiles and amphibians around the world. 

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the North Carolina chapter of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NCPARC), will have a booth on the third floor of the museum (just as you come off the escalator) with live reptiles and amphibians — collectively known as “herps.” READ MORE

 

Monday, March 6, 2017/Author: Jodie Owen/Number of views (7770)/Comments (0)/

Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament Leaves Lasting Impressions

Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament Leaves Lasting Impressions

There are many rites of spring that we witness and look forward to each year. Some are of the natural world, such as turkey gobbles, buds cracking or the return of neo-tropical migrants. Others are of our own doing. One such rite will happen for the 40th year this March and April. Every Saturday in March will see what will amount to thousands of middle and high schoolers competing in what has become a showcase of outdoor skill. The Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament (YHEST) series begins in March with nine district competitions that play the role of proving ground. The best of each district qualify to attend the state competition, which is held on the last Saturday in April. The morning of the state competition, more than 600 participants from every corner of North Carolina will arrive at the John Lentz Hunter Education Complex in Ellerbe to display the skills they have honed from countless hours of practice over the years of their young lives. READ MORE
Friday, February 24, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (3992)/Comments (1)/

I see smoke! Are the game lands on fire?

I see smoke! Are the game lands on fire?

Most likely, yes. We’re now in the “prescribed burn” season—late winter and spring.  The Commission uses controlled, low-level flames to restore and maintain wildlife habitat on most of the 2 million acres of state game lands used by hunters, anglers and wildlife watchers.

In North Carolina, prescribed burning is commonly conducted between January and March, when most trees are less active metabolically. Repeated burns conducted during the spring growing season eventually kill hardwood sprouts, allowing a diversity of native grasses, herbs and wildflowers to develop. These herbaceous plants are typically more valuable than hardwood sprouts for food and cover for wildlife. Without prescribed burns, wildlife in some habitats may experience low reproduction and eventual displacement. READ MORE

 

Friday, February 10, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (11802)/Comments (2)/

Yellow Perch Fishing In January by Bob Daw

Yellow Perch Fishing In January by Bob Daw

One of our long-time Facebook followers Bob Daw has seen a lot in his 66 years on earth. An avid fisherman and outdoor enthusiast, Bob lives on beautiful Blounts Creek in Beaufort County and spends much of his free time fishing, taking photographs and just enjoying the bountiful natural resources offered by Blounts Creek. He recently submitted the photo above, reminiscing about some favorite memories of mid-winter fishing in his youth. He is our guest blogger for this month. This is Goldsboro fishermen Scott Mooring showing one of his fat Raccoon Perch that he caught in Blounts Creek.  I am 66 years old, and one of my favorite memories as a ten year old farm boy living down a path, off a dirt road in Goldsboro was my daddy and uncles waiting for the second week of January to convoy our old trucks & small boats towards Cotton Patch Landing to catch Raccoon Perch.  Blounts Creek offers different types of fish  for all seasons of the year.  Old timers...
Tuesday, February 9, 2016/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (7063)/Comments (0)/

RSS
First1213141516171921