Concealed Carry Permit for Firearms Prompts Questions

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 14, 2010) – A change in federal law that allows firearms in many national parks does not include state parks and forests or other state recreational areas, including game lands. According to the National Park Service of the U.S. Department of Interior, people who can legally possess firearms under federal and state law can now possess those firearms in the national parks in that state. This pertains to anyone with a concealed carry permit. National parks should not be confused with national forests. In North Carolina, the Nantahala, Pisgah, Uwharrie and Croatan national forests are also designated as game lands. “Concealed carry permits do not supersede the other regulations that apply,” said Maj. Keith Templeton, with the Law Enforcement Division of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “It is up to the individual with a valid concealed carry permit to know the law and obey it.” Under game land regula
Tuesday, April 13, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (29248)/Comments (0)/

Another Nashville Angler Reels in White Crappie State Record from Tar River Reservoir

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 14, 2010) – For the second time in less than month, a Nashville angler has reeled in the white crappie state record from the Tar River Reservoir. Ray Patterson caught the latest record-breaker, which weighed 3 pounds, 12 ounces, on April 6, surpassing by a mere one ounce the previous record holder, caught by Tracey Smith on March 8. Patterson used a cane pole and a live minnow, a bait he swears by, claiming a live minnow catches crappie in a way that no jig can. And he should know. Catching big crappie is a favorite pastime for Patterson, who crappie fishes the reservoir at least three times each week, from the first of April to the middle of June. He said he’s caught many crappie, some of which would have beaten the one that earned him the new state record. In fact, he said he didn’t think the one he caught on April 6 was a record breaker; however, a couple of anglers in a boat beside him told him the fish was the biggest c
Tuesday, April 13, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (10945)/Comments (0)/

Wildlife Commission Urges Public to Leave Young Animals Alone

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 9, 2010) – Pups, cubs, chicks and kits are a welcome sign of spring in North Carolina – and it may be tempting to pick them up or feed them, especially when they nest close to our homes. But tampering with wildlife – even young wildlife -- jeopardizes innocent people and harms the ecosystem. “Wild animals are not pets, and they are not meant to be raised and fed by humans,” said David Cobb, chief of the Commission’s Division of Wildlife Management. “Wild animals never totally lose their wild instincts, even if the animal seems tame. Those instincts can show up anytime and the results can be harmful to people and the animal.” Capturing and handling a young animal can stress it, sometimes fatally. In addition, young animals that look abandoned often are not. Many species do not stay with their young and only return to feed them. The parent may return and become aggressive i
Thursday, April 8, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (6303)/Comments (0)/

Commission Gives Tips on Coexisting with Bears

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 8, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is offering a few simple steps to avoid most conflicts with black bears, as sightings and conflicts tend to increase in the spring, when bears emerge from hibernation, looking for food. The Commission is warning people not to feed, either purposely or inadvertently, animals that wander into backyards, city streets and other residential areas. Feeding a bear rewards it for coming close to people and their homes and makes it more likely to approach again. While black bears are rarely aggressive toward people, they can become bold when they become accustomed to feeding on human-provided foods, such as garbage and bird seed. Oftentimes, they lose their fear of people. Contrary to popular belief, wildlife employees will not trap and relocate bears, because this would simply relocate the problem, rather than solve it. The solution is to modify habits, such as how you feed your pet(s) or where you stor
Wednesday, April 7, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9291)/Comments (0)/

Commission, Partners Opening Eagle Observation Platform

RALEIGH, N.C. (April 7, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the New Hope Audubon Society to open a wildlife observation platform – where viewers can spot eagles, ducks and other wildlife – at Jordan Lake. The Commission and its partners will celebrate the opening with a ceremony starting at 1:30 p.m. April 18 at the site, off Martha’s Chapel Road in Chatham County. After that, it will be open to the public for wildlife viewing. The event will feature a nature hike to the platform, which overlooks the lake. A wetland area – prime habitat for salamanders and frogs – is nearby. Spotting scopes will be set up to view eagles and other birds, and participants can see songbirds, salamanders and native plants during the brief hike from the parking lot to the viewing platform. Representatives from the Commission, New Hope Audubon Society and Army Corps of Engi
Tuesday, April 6, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (12558)/Comments (0)/

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