Tern Turret Tidings – The Black-“Crowned” Birds are Back in Town

Tern Turret Tidings – The Black-“Crowned” Birds are Back in Town

The black-“crowned” birds are back in town. Over the last couple of weeks, least terns have been checking out the rooftop of the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores in Carteret County. Staff with the aquarium and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission are hopeful that the birds will soon begin nesting on the rooftop for a second year in a row.

Least terns are the smallest terns found in North America, measuring between . . . MORE

Friday, April 27, 2018/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (6218)/Comments (0)/

Backyard Bird Basics: A How-To Guide

Backyard Bird Basics: A How-To Guide

Text and photos by Malorey Henderson

Who doesn't love backyard birds? They add beauty to the landscape and serenade us with their sweet songs. We often put out feeders to attract these lovely little critters to our homes. One of the best ways to attract birds and give back to them as they brighten our days is through native plant gardens. With the sprawl of urban areas, good bird habitat is increasingly in short supply. MORE

Thursday, March 22, 2018/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (11770)/Comments (0)/

Help Us Celebrate “The Year of the Bird” and Get Your Winter Birding On!

Help Us Celebrate “The Year of the Bird” and Get Your Winter Birding On!

It’s 2018 – 100 years since the passage of one of the most important bird-protection laws in history – the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. To celebrate this milestone, National Geographic, Audubon and others have declared this year “The Year of the Bird.”  

And if you’ve ever wanted to learn more about birds, this is your year! Over the next 11 months, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission . . . MORE

Wednesday, February 14, 2018/Author: Jodie Owen/Number of views (9694)/Comments (1)/

Wildlife Commission and Partners Create Better Habitat for Rare Wildlife Species

Wildlife Commission and Partners Create Better Habitat for Rare Wildlife Species

In September, staff with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with partners and volunteers, planted 900 red spruce seedlings on the Pisgah National Forest to help create better habitat for many rare wildlife species including the Carolina northern flying squirrel, red crossbill, brown creeper and northern saw-whet owl. READ MORE

Friday, October 27, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (9680)/Comments (0)/

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

A $200 bounty on hellbenders? Say it’s not so.

“That is a rumor and absolutely untrue,” said Lori Williams, a Wildlife Diversity biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “Furthermore, the Eastern hellbender is listed as a species of special concern in North Carolina. Harming, harassing, collecting or killing one is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can result in a fine and up to 120 days in jail.”

Hellbenders are one of the largest salamanders found in North Carolina, averaging 16-17 inches long but can grow up to 24 inches long.

Also called the “water dog,” “snot otter,” “Alleghany alligator,” among other names, the hellbender is a harmless, giant aquatic salamander found in fast-moving, clean mountain streams in . . .
 

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Tuesday, May 9, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (20372)/Comments (0)/

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