Longtime Hunter Education Specialist Fred Rorrer Dies Unexpectedly

RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 15, 2010) – Fred Rorrer, a longtime hunter education specialist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission who taught thousands of North Carolinians about respect and enjoyment of the outdoors, died unexpectedly Monday, Oct. 11. He was 52 years old. Services will be held at 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 16th, at the Fair Funeral Home, 432 Boone Road, Eden. The family will receive friends beginning one hour prior to the service at Fair Funeral Home. “Fred Rorrer was the caliber of man who, whether personally or professionally, represented conservation and this agency in the best possible way,” said Col. Dale Caveny, chief of the Commission’s Division of Law Enforcement, which administers the state’s Hunter Education Program. “He was an avid outdoorsman and a great ambassador for hunting and fishing. His passing leaves a void and, for those who knew him, a real hurt.” As a hunter education
Thursday, October 14, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (8356)/Comments (0)/

Seminar Looks at the Human Dimension in Wildlife Conservation

RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 14, 2010) – Human dimensions in wildlife conservation – the “people aspect” of nature – will be the topic for the Oct. 27th Fisheries and Wildlife Seminar at the Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education. The seminar, titled “Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management: What is it and Why Should You Care?” will be presented by Dr. Nils Peterson and Kerry Linehan at 4 p.m. following a networking session with refreshments, which begins at 3:30 p.m. An assistant professor at N.C. State University, Dr. Peterson researches the relationships of human actions and natural systems. He examines how factors from land use policies to household dynamics affect the environment and endangered wildlife populations. He will relate how this research and its applications can benefit conservation measures. As a human dimensions biologist for the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, Linehan conducts and coor
Wednesday, October 13, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (9421)/Comments (0)/

"Take It Outside" at the Wildlife Commission's State Fair Exhibit

RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 7, 2010) — “Take It Outside” at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s N.C. State Fair exhibit this year to learn more about the many outdoor opportunities offered by the agency. The exhibit, located downhill from the Village of Yesteryear, is open to the public from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., on Oct. 14, and from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Oct. 15-24. The ‘Take It Outside’ exhibit provides an indication of the many hunting, fishing, boating, watching and learning opportunities provided to the public by the Commission. Visitors can check out a 12-foot, interactive map to find places to hunt, fish, boat and wildlife watch within 50 miles of where they live. “We want everyone who visits our tent to know that there are likely several places near their homes where they can wet a line, go hunting or boating, or simply watch wildlife,” said Penny Miller, communications director for the Commission.
Wednesday, October 6, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (8902)/Comments (0)/

Heavy Rains Cause Game Lands Access Road Closures

RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 1, 2010) –  The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is alerting citizens that many access roads to game lands in the coastal region of the state have been closed due to flooding from heavy rains. Closed roads will be barricaded and marked with signs. The Commission will make every effort to open the roads as soon as they are able to withstand vehicular use. Learn more about North Carolina’s game lands, and view an interactive, searchable map.
Thursday, September 30, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (11044)/Comments (0)/

Wildlife Friendly Development Certification Program Unveiled

RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 30, 2010) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with the North Carolina Wildlife Federation and the North Carolina chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, has unveiled a green-growth initiative that encourages wildlife-friendly practices for new and existing residential developments. The Wildlife Friendly Development Certification program recognizes residential land developers who promote the conservation of wildlife habitat and use environmentally sound construction practices in their developments. Developments that are certified as wildlife friendly incorporate features that protect existing habitats by providing food, water, cover and places to raise young, the four components of suitable wildlife habitat. Once certified, these developments can be marketed to homeowners who value the protection of natural resources. To acquire certification, developers work closely with the staffs from the Commission and Federation
Wednesday, September 29, 2010/Author: Gayle Myers/Number of views (13001)/Comments (0)/

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