FAQs

Will NCWRC pick up an animal I have trapped?

No. When setting a trap, it is your responsibility to not only follow all trapping rules and regulations but also be prepared to handle any animals that you trap. It is the responsibility of the trapper to visit traps daily and remove any captured animal(s). Most wildlife species cannot be relocated. Due to 15A NCAC 10B .0106, wild animals in the order Carnivora, armadillos, groundhogs, nutria, and beaver trapped under depredation circumstances shall be humanly euthanized at the site of capture or at a facility. If you do not want to release the animal yourself, a Wildlife Damage Control Agent can be hired.

Who picks up dead animals?

Property owners are responsible for disposing of dead animals on their property. The animal can be buried or left to decompose naturally. Some cities/counties offer a curbside pick-up service. DOT may remove dead animals on state-maintained roadways if causing traffic concerns. Wildlife Damage Control Agents can be hired to remove dead animals, however not all agents offer this service.

Can wildlife be relocated?

Most wildlife species cannot be relocated. Due to 15A NCAC 10B .0106, wild animals in the order Carnivora, armadillos, groundhogs, nutria, and beaver trapped under depredation circumstances shall be humanely euthanized either at the site of capture or at a facility designed to humanely handle the euthanasia or released on the property where captured. Feral swine shall be euthanized while still in the trap in accordance with G.S. 113-291.12. For all other animals taken alive, the animal shall be euthanized or released on property with permission from the property owner.

How can I protect my pet from wildlife?

The best way to protect your pets from interacting with wildlife is through supervision. Keep pets contained, leashed or supervised when outside. Domestic pets left alone outside become vulnerable to interactions with wildlife and should not be left to roam the property alone, especially at night.

What are the consequences of feeding wildlife?

Feeding wildlife can cause animals to lose their fear of people, and become accustomed to human presence. This can lead to animals becoming aggressive, and can increase the spread of wildlife diseases. Additionally, human food is not healthy for wild animals and they do not need food from humans to survive.

Hazards of Feeding Wildlife (PDF)

 


Call 866-318-2401

Monday- Friday 8am- 5pm

hwi@ncwildlife.org

Preventing Wildlife Conflicts

 

Human-wildlife interactions are becoming more common with the rise of human populations and development of natural areas. There are many techniques that humans can utilize on their property to maintain positive interactions with wildlife. The information below provides general techniques and preventative measures for N.C. residents to prevent and alleviate issues with wildlife. Keep in mind that wild animals are in search of food, water, shelter and safety. Eliminating these needs on your property can greatly reduce wildlife problems.

 

  • Do not feed wildlife. This will cause animals to lose their natural fear of humans and they will seek out humans for food. Do not throw food scraps out into the yard.
  • Do not leave pet food outside; Remove food bowls when pets are not eating and keep bags of food inside or in a secure container.
  • Install secure bird feeders that exclude non-target species such as squirrels, raccoons and bears. If you live in bear country, remove feeders immediately if a bear has been visiting them.
  • Close crawl spaces and openings under houses, porches and outbuildings. Animals will utilize these spaces to den and raise their young.
  • Trim tree limbs around structures to prevent wild animals from getting access to your house, bird feeders and outbuildings.
  • Protect gardens, beehives and chickens with fencing. Chicken wire, buried underground in an outward 90-degree angle can prevent animals from burrowing underneath. A line of electric wire strung above fencing can prevent animals going over the fence. Free-ranging chickens and other small livestock are highly vulnerable to predation by several wildlife species. Bee-hives in bear county can be protected with electric fencing to prevent damage.  
  • Keep small pets contained, leashed or supervised when outside. Domestic pets left alone outside become vulnerable to interactions with wildlife and should not be left to roam the property alone, especially at night.
  • Basic hazing should be used to communicate to wild animals that your yard is not a welcome area in addition to the techniques mentioned above.
  • Communicate with neighbors about wildlife issues you are experiencing. A local group effort is crucial to remedying issues.

 

If a wildlife problem persists after suggested techniques have been used, there are options available to help solve a wildlife problem. See individual species’ pages for relevant information on how to solve your wildlife issue.

Contact a Wildlife Damage Control Agent

BEFORE YOU CALL, FOLLOW THESE STEPS!

  • Identify the species of wildlife involved.
  • Consider the preventative measures above to reduce interactions with wildlife.
  • Before contacting for assistance be certain the animal is causing property damage so as to require action.

If these measures fail to resolve the wildlife-caused damage, contact a Wildlife Damage Control Agent by county of residence.  Select a county from the drop down menu below:

(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)