Ways to Support


  • The Wildlife Diversity Program’s largest and most significant source of state funding is the North Carolina Tax Check-off for Nongame and Endangered Wildlife.  Just enter an amount on line 31 of your North Carolina income tax form. Learn more about the Wildlife Diversity Program.
  • The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, in conjunction with the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles, offers both serial numbered plates and personalized plates for cars, campers and trailers. The serialized plates are $20 and the personalized plates are $50, in addition to the annual renewal fee.  Download an application here or order online.

Wildlife Diversity Program

More than 1,000 nongame animals — animals that are not hunted or fished — call North Carolina home.

Many nongame species, including mammals, reptiles, birds, amphibians, snails, mussels, and fish, are common and can be seen or heard in your own backyard. Other nongame animals, such as bald eagles and peregrine falcons, were, at one time, considered endangered, but now soar high in the sky, thanks in part to the work conducted by Wildlife Diversity Program biologists.

You Can Keep North Carolina Wild
Whether you love to hunt, fish, bird watch, or just want to do your part to ensure that wildlife in North Carolina has biodiversity, you can help Wildlife Diversity Program biologists continue their work by donating to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission uses Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund donations to support the research, conservation and management of nongame animals and endangered wildlife species. Biologists with the Commission work toward maintaining viable, self-sustaining populations of all native wildlife, with an emphasis on priority species and habitats identified in North Carolina’s Wildlife Action Plan.

Nongame projects are primarily funded through donations and every dollar in donations given to the fund is matched with federal and other grants, so donated dollars actually count twice.

Learn More About The Program

Projects, Events,  Partnerships and Volunteer Opportunities

Quarterly Reports

Nongame projects are primarily funded through donations and every dollar in donations given to the fund is matched with federal and other grants, so donated dollars actually count twice. Click here for Wildlife Diversity Program Quarterly Updates. 

Wildlife conservation is about making sure that our children’s children can hunt, fish, birdwatch, photograph or enjoy the bountiful wildlife that our parents did, and it is about ensuring that we have clean water and wild places to enjoy in our great state. Contributions to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund allow the Wildlife Diversity Program staff to continue this important work.”