Injured / Orphaned Wildlife

Animals will often be more aggressive if they are injured or diseased. Be extremely cautious when approaching any injured animal or animal which appears to be sick or is acting in an abnormal manner.

Relocate children and pets indoors. Bats, foxes, raccoons and skunks cannot be rehabilitated due to the possibility of rabies and should not be handled.

Locate a Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator (See below) in your area if you find an injured animal. Licensed wildlife rehabilitators provide care for an animal to a point in which it can be released back into its natural environment.

Contact a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Is it injured?

  1. If the animal is able to move on its own, than it’s not injured. Best thing to do is just leave it alone.
  2. If it’s still alive and just not moving, then it’s still not necessarily injured. Certain species have a tendency to become very still when they think it’s threatened or cornered. The best thing to do is leave it alone for at least 24 hours and allow it to move on its own.
  3. If it is obviously injured and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county.

Is the animal orphaned?

  1. Just because a young animal is alone and the adult cannot be seen doesn’t mean the animal is orphaned. Many juvenile animals are left alone by the adult for long periods of times or merely have fallen out of their nest. Since it’s always best to give the adults the opportunity to re-establish contact and take care of their own offspring, a good rule of thumb is to leave it alone for 24 to 48 hours to determine if parent will return.
  2. If the dead adult is found close by to the young animal and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county. 

 

Click image to enlarge.

Find rehabilitators in your county by selecting from the drop-down list below.
(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)


Contact a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Is it injured?

  1. If the animal is able to move on its own, than it’s not injured. Best thing to do is just leave it alone.
  2. If it’s still alive and just not moving, then it’s still not necessarily injured. Certain species have a tendency to become very still when they think it’s threatened or cornered. The best thing to do is leave it alone for at least 24 hours and allow it to move on its own.
  3. If it is obviously injured and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county.

Is the animal orphaned?

  1. Just because a young animal is alone and the adult cannot be seen doesn’t mean the animal is orphaned. Many juvenile animals are left alone by the adult for long periods of times or merely have fallen out of their nest. Since it’s always best to give the adults the opportunity to re-establish contact and take care of their own offspring, a good rule of thumb is to leave it alone for 24 to 48 hours to determine if parent will return.
  2. If the dead adult is found close by to the young animal and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county. 

 

Click image to enlarge.

Find rehabilitators in your county by selecting from the drop-down list below.
(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)


Contact a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Is it injured?

  1. If the animal is able to move on its own, than it’s not injured. Best thing to do is just leave it alone.
  2. If it’s still alive and just not moving, then it’s still not necessarily injured. Certain species have a tendency to become very still when they think it’s threatened or cornered. The best thing to do is leave it alone for at least 24 hours and allow it to move on its own.
  3. If it is obviously injured and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county.

Is the animal orphaned?

  1. Just because a young animal is alone and the adult cannot be seen doesn’t mean the animal is orphaned. Many juvenile animals are left alone by the adult for long periods of times or merely have fallen out of their nest. Since it’s always best to give the adults the opportunity to re-establish contact and take care of their own offspring, a good rule of thumb is to leave it alone for 24 to 48 hours to determine if parent will return.
  2. If the dead adult is found close by to the young animal and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county. 

 

Click image to enlarge.

Find rehabilitators in your county by selecting from the drop-down list below.
(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)


Contact a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Is it injured?

  1. If the animal is able to move on its own, than it’s not injured. Best thing to do is just leave it alone.
  2. If it’s still alive and just not moving, then it’s still not necessarily injured. Certain species have a tendency to become very still when they think it’s threatened or cornered. The best thing to do is leave it alone for at least 24 hours and allow it to move on its own.
  3. If it is obviously injured and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county.

Is the animal orphaned?

  1. Just because a young animal is alone and the adult cannot be seen doesn’t mean the animal is orphaned. Many juvenile animals are left alone by the adult for long periods of times or merely have fallen out of their nest. Since it’s always best to give the adults the opportunity to re-establish contact and take care of their own offspring, a good rule of thumb is to leave it alone for 24 to 48 hours to determine if parent will return.
  2. If the dead adult is found close by to the young animal and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county. 

 

Click image to enlarge.

Find rehabilitators in your county by selecting from the drop-down list below.
(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)


Contact a Wildlife Rehabilitator

Is it injured?

  1. If the animal is able to move on its own, than it’s not injured. Best thing to do is just leave it alone.
  2. If it’s still alive and just not moving, then it’s still not necessarily injured. Certain species have a tendency to become very still when they think it’s threatened or cornered. The best thing to do is leave it alone for at least 24 hours and allow it to move on its own.
  3. If it is obviously injured and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county.

Is the animal orphaned?

  1. Just because a young animal is alone and the adult cannot be seen doesn’t mean the animal is orphaned. Many juvenile animals are left alone by the adult for long periods of times or merely have fallen out of their nest. Since it’s always best to give the adults the opportunity to re-establish contact and take care of their own offspring, a good rule of thumb is to leave it alone for 24 to 48 hours to determine if parent will return.
  2. If the dead adult is found close by to the young animal and is not one of the high risk for rabies listed above, then go to the bottom of this section to search for a Wildlife Rehabilitator in your county. 

 

Click image to enlarge.

Find rehabilitators in your county by selecting from the drop-down list below.
(POP-UP REMINDER NOTE - When a county is selected, the page will open in a new window and sometimes be recognized as a pop-up page.  On some devices and browsers, pop-ups must be enabled for the drop down menu to function properly. For information on how to enable pop-ups, see browser or mobile device documentation on how to enable pop-ups.)


Contact a Fawn Rehabilitator

View the map/list below to contact a permitted fawn rehabilitator:

Contact a Fawn Rehabilitator

View the map/list below to contact a permitted fawn rehabilitator:

Contact a Fawn Rehabilitator

View the map/list below to contact a permitted fawn rehabilitator:

Other contacts

  • You may also contact your local veterinarian for the name of a rehabilitator in the area, or to ask if they would be willing to help.
  • You can also call the Wildlife Permits and License Office at (919) 707-0060 or Wildlife Enforcement Communications at (919) 707-0040 to obtain the name and telephone number of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator in your area.
  • Injured Deer or Black Bear
    The Wildlife Enforcement Division should be called in the case of injured deer or black bear at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 for Wake County.
  • Injured Endangered/Threatened Species
    If the injured animal can be identified as an endangered or threatened species, contact the Wildlife Enforcement Division at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 or the US Fish and Wildlife Service at (919) 856-4786.

Other contacts

  • You may also contact your local veterinarian for the name of a rehabilitator in the area, or to ask if they would be willing to help.
  • You can also call the Wildlife Permits and License Office at (919) 707-0060 or Wildlife Enforcement Communications at (919) 707-0040 to obtain the name and telephone number of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator in your area.
  • Injured Deer or Black Bear
    The Wildlife Enforcement Division should be called in the case of injured deer or black bear at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 for Wake County.
  • Injured Endangered/Threatened Species
    If the injured animal can be identified as an endangered or threatened species, contact the Wildlife Enforcement Division at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 or the US Fish and Wildlife Service at (919) 856-4786.

Other contacts

  • You may also contact your local veterinarian for the name of a rehabilitator in the area, or to ask if they would be willing to help.
  • You can also call the Wildlife Permits and License Office at (919) 707-0060 or Wildlife Enforcement Communications at (919) 707-0040 to obtain the name and telephone number of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator in your area.
  • Injured Deer or Black Bear
    The Wildlife Enforcement Division should be called in the case of injured deer or black bear at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 for Wake County.
  • Injured Endangered/Threatened Species
    If the injured animal can be identified as an endangered or threatened species, contact the Wildlife Enforcement Division at 1-800-662-7137, or (919) 707-0040 or the US Fish and Wildlife Service at (919) 856-4786.