Conserve & Protect
The Blog of N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission

Comments to Conserve & Protect blog site are encouraged.
The site is monitored and we ask that all comments:

  • Be respectful and relevant.
  • Do not defame, threaten or otherwise violate the rights, such as privacy, of others.
  • Do not advertise or promote a product or service.
  • Do not violate any applicable laws or regulations, or promote unsafe or illegal actions.

**This is a monitored site and all comments are subject to public records law. Comments made after the close of business, on weekends and holidays will be posted the following work day.



View Blog

By NCWRC blogger on 4/28/2012 9:07 AM

On Saturday morning, teams from schools across the state arrived at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s 34th Hunter Education Tournament.

Here’s how it breaks down, by the numbers:

High school students: 341

Middle school students: 259

Tents in staging area: 36

Rain: None yet

Port-a-johns: 16

Shuttle buses from parking lot: 3

Boxes of skeet: 50

Skeet per box: 135

Bows: About 300

Parents and coaches gathered around the scoreboard at 10 a.m.: 12

By NCWRC blogger on 4/27/2012 7:23 PM
It’s 5:30 p.m. on Friday, and the shooting range is quiet.

So’s the archery range, orienteering course and parking lot, for that matter.

But come 7 a.m. Saturday morning, the situation will change. Here at the Millstone 4-H Center near Ellerbe, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will host the 34th annual Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament.

This popular state championship for pre-collegiate shooting sports annually draws participants and spectators from across North Carolina. An estimated 3,000 people are expected to attend this year’s event.

The parking lot will fill with teams from 54 schools across North Carolina, proud parents, siblings and picnic lunches in tow. Students will be ready to take aim with shotguns and bows, and test their wildlife knowledge and orienteering skills.

Long before the students arrive, however, the several dozen volunteers, Hunter Education Instructors, Hunter Education Specialists, officers from the Commission’s Division of Law Enforcement and other agency staff have shown up to make sure the camp is ready for the students. Ranges have been set up. Archery targets sit in a stack, waiting to be used. Sunscreen, water and television scoreboards are readied.

...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/26/2012 8:28 AM
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will host the 34th annual Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament on Saturday, April 28, at the Millstone 4-H Center near Ellerbe. This popular state championship for pre-collegiate shooting sports annually draws participants and spectators from across North Carolina. An estimated 3,000 people are expected to attend this year’s event. “This is the highest level of shooting sports competition of its kind in the state,” said Travis Casper, state hunter education coordinator. “Besides the hundreds of participants who qualified to get here at a district level, several hundred more spectators typically show up. We invite anyone with an interest in shooting sports to attend and there’s no admission charge.”

Competition is conducted on senior (high school) and junior (middle and elementary schools) divisional levels, with overall team...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/26/2012 7:44 AM
Visit the Striped Bass Fishing page for more information on striped bass fishing in the Roanoke River.

In this last week of striped bass harvest, the fishing has been up and down, hit or miss, depending on when you’re fishing and where you’re fishing. While most everyone expected that the season would be in high gear by now, cooler, wetter weather put a damper on the fishing action over the last week – a trend that hasn’t picked up quite yet. 

The cooler water temperatures resulted in a decrease in spawning activity, which means the fish should be in Weldon for a good while longer, waiting for the water temperatures to go up. Just how much longer is anybody’s guess. If you want to go fishing, and particularly if you want to keep your daily limit of two fish, you need to head to the river before next Monday, which is the last day of the harvest season.

Even fisheries biologists,...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/20/2012 9:10 AM
A recent N.C. State University study has shown that feral swine in North Carolina have tested positive for brucellosis (Brucella suis), a harmful bacteria that can be transmitted to people.

For details and more information on this study, visit N.C. State’s website.

For more information on brucellosis, download the brochure, “Wild Hog Hunting” Stay Healthy on Your Hunt.” To learn more about other swine diseases, download “Feral/Wild Pigs: Potential Problems for Farmers and Hunters.”

A free, pre-paid mailer for submitting feral swine samples to the state diagnostic lab for swine brucellosis testing is available by calling the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Veterinary Division, at 919-733-7601.

...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/19/2012 8:02 AM
Visit the Striped Bass Fishing page for more information on striped bass fishing in the Roanoke River.

“We’re heading towards the peak.”

The “peak” Jeremy McCargo is referring to is the peak of striped bass fishing on the Roanoke River for this year.

McCargo, a fisheries biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with fellow biologists Ben Ricks and Kevin Dockendorf, sampled the river at Weldon on Monday, collecting about  330 stripers, more than double their efforts from last week. About two dozen of the fish collected this week were large females —the biggest fish so far —indicating that the fish are moving on to the spawning grounds in greater numbers and with greater intensity. Fishing over the next couple weeks should be optimal so if you’ve been waiting patiently for the stripers to arrive to make a trip to the Roanoke worth your while, well . . . your...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/18/2012 11:09 AM
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will host the 34th annual Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament on Saturday, April 28, at the Millstone 4-H Center near Ellerbe. This popular state championship for pre-collegiate shooting sports annually draws participants and spectators from across North Carolina. An estimated 3,000 people are expected to attend this year’s event.

“This is the highest level of shooting sports competition of its kind in the state,” said Travis Casper, state hunter education coordinator. “Besides the hundreds of participants who qualified to get here at a district level, several hundred more spectators typically show up. We invite anyone with an interest in shooting sports to attend and there’s no admission charge.”

Competition is conducted on senior (high school) and junior (middle and elementary...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/17/2012 8:56 AM
You may glance at this video and wonder just what the heck these folks are doing to these birds.

Catching them in nets. Ruffling their feathers. Putting shiny silver rings on their legs.

But trust us, people — this is all in the name of good, sound science.

Banding songbirds, like these scientists are doing, is a tool to determine waxing and waning songbird populations, habits and habitats. All in a day’s work for some of the biologists from the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation,

Here, biologists are determining songbird populations in the Sandy Run Savannas State Natural Area. They catch the birds in mist nests, which cause no harm, and carefully examine and record each bird’s age, weight and other characteristics. They also fit each bird’s leg with a numbered band, which is registered with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, so that if that bird is caught again, anywhere in the world, its location can be noted and monitored.

...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/16/2012 10:26 AM
Ever wonder how the turkey population in North Carolina is doing from year to year?

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission conducts a survey each summer to find those answers. From asking participants about the turkeys they observed between July 1 and August 31, 2011, biologists can determine wild turkey productivity and carryover of gobblers from the previous season.

Who typically gets surveyed?  A bunch of folks, including members of the National Wild Turkey Federation, sportsmen, personnel from the Commission, N.C. Forest Service, U.S. Forest Service, several military bases and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  It’s a large, diverse group to survey, and the respondents provide a lot of useful data.

For example, the 680 participants in 2011 observed 32,877 wild turkeys statewide. Of the hens, 59 percent had poults,...
By NCWRC blogger on 4/12/2012 8:41 AM
Visit the Striped Bass Fishing page for more information on striped bass fishing in the Roanoke River.

No matter where you’re fishing in the Roanoke River now, you can catch stripers. That’s the assessment coming from N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission biologists and creel clerks this week. From Plymouth to Jamesville to Williamston, even in Hamilton, and all the way up river to Weldon, anglers are catching stripers. Although not in large numbers yet, the fish are starting to move in to the spawning grounds at Weldon in greater numbers.

Fisheries biologists Jeremy McCargo and Ben Ricks sampled the river on Monday at Weldon, collecting about 150 striped bass. They collect stripers as part of an annual spawning stock monitoring survey, which starts in mid-March and lasts through mid-May. They count, measure and weigh the fish before returning them back to the river. Before they release...

Recent Entries

Black Bears Rebound in State by Abbie Bennett
Blackpowder Hunting Clarified
The Monster Blue Cats of Lake Gaston
Prescribed Burns Explained
Shelley Lake Fawn Rescued by Linda Chamblee
“WIIW” Gone Wild!

Search Blog

You must be logged in and have permission to create or edit a blog.