Conserve & Protect
The Blog of N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission

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By NCWRC blogger on 9/11/2012 12:11 PM
With archery season for deer opening on Saturday in most of the state and on Monday in the western counties, the Home From The Hunt™ safety campaign lists the following recommendations:
• Always point your crossbow, longbow, compound bow in a safe direction.
• Only release an arrow after positively identifying your target and what’s beyond it.
• Know your equipment’s capabilities and limitations.
• Never carry a bow with a notched arrow.
• Keep your fingers and thumb below the rail of a crossbow at all times.
• Never “dry-fire” any archery equipment, because releasing without an arrow can cause sudden breakage.

For more information on deer seasons and required hunting education, go to www.ncwildlife.org or call 919-707-0031.
By NCWRC blogger on 9/10/2012 11:38 AM
(Editor’s Note: For the past two summers, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Centennial Center for Wildlife Education has offered the “Becoming an Outdoors Diva” camp for girls ages 12 to 17. Madeline Rickard, 14, participated both years. Here, she writes about her experiences. She is in the middle of the photograph.) The days were jam packed and exhausting, and oftentimes sweaty, but it was so much fun that I didn’t even realize how tired I was until I was falling asleep on the ride home every day. That was Becoming an Outdoors Diva camp, and it was a great experience for all types of girls, even ones who prefer to stay inside. The camp was actually split pretty evenly between being inside and outside, so we had plenty of chances to cool off and rest. We were always moving on to something new and trying out a lot of different activities, so you tried...
By NCWRC blogger on 9/4/2012 11:04 AM
My son Jack went on his first hunt Saturday. He is 5 years old and his father and I discussed for weeks whether he was old enough to go. I thought he might be too young — he is, after all, only 5. My husband Wib, who went on his first hunt — for doves with his own father — at age 6, thought the time was right. 

Jack settled the debate with one simple sentence . . . “I want to go hunting with Dad.” In fact, it was all he talked about for weeks leading up to the opening of dove season. He even concocted a type of calendar that only he could understand “counting down the days” until Sept. 1.

Wib wanted this first hunt to be a good one for Jack — lots of birds and the sounds of shotguns ringing in the air — memories from his own first hunt, an experience that got him hooked on hunting for life. He wanted that same experience for Jack.

To alleviate any boredom that might set in and to give Jack a sense of participating in the hunt, Wib designated Jack as the “retriever,” bringing back the birds that Wib brought down. Jack loved it, despite the fact that he only brought back three the entire morning.

...

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