Conserve & Protect
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Author: Created: 11/30/2011 10:30 AM
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Blog
By NCWRC blogger on 11/27/2012 11:21 AM
Last year North Carolina hunters harvested more than 2,000 black bears, from the mountains to the coast. And while those bears might be a great accomplishment and trophy to the hunters who bagged them, they are just as valuable to us at the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.
By NCWRC blogger on 11/19/2012 4:05 PM

This time of year is a season for tradition and heritage. People will gather with families and friends reminiscing about old times,enjoying the present and making memories for the future — from eating turkey,watching football, drinking eggnog, hanging greenery and hunting. The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission through its Home From The Hunt™ campaign urges everyone not to overlook the safety aspects of your hunting outings with family and friends.

By NCWRC blogger on 11/15/2012 9:36 AM
Bennett Wynne, a biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Division of Inland Fisheries, was recognized at the Commission’s business meeting last week for selection as the 2012 Fisheries Biologist of the Year — an honor bestowed on him by the Southeastern Association of State Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
By NCWRC blogger on 11/9/2012 1:20 PM

RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 9, 2012) — State Fairs and County Fairs may have ended last month, but follow-up work and debriefings continue into the winter. One topic of discussion within the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission addresses the Wildlife Diversity Buttons T-shirt that was developed in cooperation with Neuse Sport Shop this year as a fund-raiser for the Wildlife Diversity Program.
By NCWRC blogger on 10/30/2012 10:09 AM
RALEIGH,N.C. (Oct. 30, 2012) — Chalk up this topic as one of the things that make you go, “Hmmmmmmmmmmm.” Think about it. It wasn’t that long ago when we all would have yawned at the idea of buying, selling and trading water rights as a natural resource commodity as valuable as timber rights or mineral rights. And we would have outright LOLed (had we known what the acronym stood for) at the thought of going to the grocery store to buy bottled spring water, water filters, flavored water, and just plain ol’ drinking water.

But these days water is, indeed, a limiting factor — an important resource to consider in community planning for humans, and an integral factor in the equation of fish and wildlife management. Nowhere is this more important than in the arid Southwest of the United States where wildlife managers and biologists...
By NCWRC blogger on 10/26/2012 2:08 PM
A blustery, rainy weekend is blowing its way into North Carolina — at least for much of the eastern portion of the state. And while the weather isn’t ideal for outdoor activities, it is ideal for cooking up a big, steaming batch of venison chili. 

I’ve been making chili for a long time and am always lookingfor different recipes to try and tweak. Last weekend, I found — and tested — a rather unusual chili recipe,one that combines chocolate and lots of spices. Despite its heat, it was verytasty twist on my usual chili recipe so I thought I’d share it with you.

One caveat: it is rather spicy, so if you have tender tastebuds, ease back on the spices, but not the chocolate. It really does make adifference!

If you have a favorite venison recipe, feel free to share it with others on this blog. And if you’re not hankering for chili but want to try some new venison recipes, check out the Wildlife Commission’s recipe book here....
By NCWRC blogger on 10/24/2012 2:03 PM

Hunters are required to wear a cap, hat or an outer garment in blaze orange that is visible from all sides whenever they are hunting bear, feral hogs, deer,rabbit, squirrel, grouse, pheasant or quail with a firearm. Archery hunters hunting deer during the muzzleloading or gun season also must wear blaze orange anytime during that season. 

Blaze orange, also known as hunter orange for obvious reasons, isn’t a color found in nature, making it instantly recognizable as a human presence. 

More information here

By NCWRC blogger on 9/11/2012 12:11 PM
With archery season for deer opening on Saturday in most of the state and on Monday in the western counties, the Home From The Hunt™ safety campaign lists the following recommendations:
• Always point your crossbow, longbow, compound bow in a safe direction.
• Only release an arrow after positively identifying your target and what’s beyond it.
• Know your equipment’s capabilities and limitations.
• Never carry a bow with a notched arrow.
• Keep your fingers and thumb below the rail of a crossbow at all times.
• Never “dry-fire” any archery equipment, because releasing without an arrow can cause sudden breakage.

For more information on deer seasons and required hunting education, go to www.ncwildlife.org or call 919-707-0031.
By NCWRC blogger on 9/10/2012 11:38 AM
(Editor’s Note: For the past two summers, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Centennial Center for Wildlife Education has offered the “Becoming an Outdoors Diva” camp for girls ages 12 to 17. Madeline Rickard, 14, participated both years. Here, she writes about her experiences. She is in the middle of the photograph.) The days were jam packed and exhausting, and oftentimes sweaty, but it was so much fun that I didn’t even realize how tired I was until I was falling asleep on the ride home every day. That was Becoming an Outdoors Diva camp, and it was a great experience for all types of girls, even ones who prefer to stay inside. The camp was actually split pretty evenly between being inside and outside, so we had plenty of chances to cool off and rest. We were always moving on to something new and trying out a lot of different activities, so you tried...
By NCWRC blogger on 9/4/2012 11:04 AM
My son Jack went on his first hunt Saturday. He is 5 years old and his father and I discussed for weeks whether he was old enough to go. I thought he might be too young — he is, after all, only 5. My husband Wib, who went on his first hunt — for doves with his own father — at age 6, thought the time was right. 

Jack settled the debate with one simple sentence . . . “I want to go hunting with Dad.” In fact, it was all he talked about for weeks leading up to the opening of dove season. He even concocted a type of calendar that only he could understand “counting down the days” until Sept. 1.

Wib wanted this first hunt to be a good one for Jack — lots of birds and the sounds of shotguns ringing in the air — memories from his own first hunt, an experience that got him hooked on hunting for life. He wanted that same experience for Jack.

To alleviate any boredom that might set in and to give Jack a sense of participating in the hunt, Wib designated Jack as the “retriever,” bringing back the birds that Wib brought down. Jack loved it, despite the fact that he only brought back three the entire morning.

...

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