on Sep 26, 2013 09:33 AM • Views 3085

Wildlife-associated recreation is important to conservation and the economy.

Media Contact: Geoff Cantrell
919-707-0186
geoff.cantrell@ncwildlife.org

RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 26, 2013) — In advance of National Hunting and Fishing Day on Saturday (Sept. 28), the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is highlighting results from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Census Bureau survey to show the importance of sportsmen to North Carolina’s economy.

The 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation measured public participation in hunting, fishing, wildlife viewing and other wildlife-dependent recreation, as well as how much money was spent pursuing these activities. For North Carolina results, click here.

North Carolina highlights:

  • $3.3 billion total spent on wildlife-related recreation in North Carolina.
  • $1.5 billion spent in North Carolina from fishing-related activities.
  • $525 million spent in North Carolina on hunting-related activities.
  • $930 million spent in North Carolina on wildlife-watching activities.

The Wildlife Commission is hosting four family-oriented National Hunting and Fishing Day events and assisting three others across the state on Saturday. Through interactive activities and demonstrations, participants can connect with nature and learn outdoor skills while gaining a better understanding about the important roles of hunting and fishing in wildlife conservation.

The National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, conducted every five years, has become one of the most important sources of information on fish and wildlife in the United States. Federal, state and private organizations use the rigorously compiled and detailed information to manage wildlife and wildlife-related recreation programs, and forecast trends in participation and economic impacts.

Nationally, more than 90 million Americans participated in wildlife-related recreation in 2011, up 3 percent from five years earlier. The increase was primarily among those who fished and hunted. The data show that 33.1 million people fished, 13.7 million hunted, and 71.8 million participated in a wildlife-watching activity. See the complete survey here.