Rank (0) Views 12588 On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 1:53 PM, 516 days ago



YANCEYVILLE, N.C. (July 19, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting July 24, at 7 p.m., in Yanceyville to seek input in developing a management plan for R. Wayne Bailey-Caswell Game Land. The meeting will be held at the Caswell County Center in the Agriculture Building.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on R. Wayne Bailey-Caswell Game Land for the next 10 years. The game land comprises 17,788 acres in Caswell County and is a popular destination for big and small game hunting, fishing, hiking, and wildlife viewing. The area may be best known for its wild turkey hunting opportunities.  Trapping and relocation of wild turkeys from this game land were pivotal in the successful restoration of the species across North Carolina.

“We are seeking input from all users of R. Wayne Bailey-Caswell Game Land and others who are interested in how the prope


Rank (0) Views 3984 On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 7:54 AM, 516 days ago



DUBLIN, N.C. (July 19, 2013) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting July 24, at 7 p.m., in Dublin to seek input in developing a management plan for Suggs Mill Pond Game Land. The meeting will be held in the auditorium at Bladen Community College.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on Suggs Mill Pond Game Land for the next 10 years. The 11,044-acre game land, which is located in Bladen and Cumberland counties, is one of four game lands in the CURE Program and is managed primarily for early successional habitat. It is a permit-hunt only gameland and some of the most popular game species are deer, turkey and waterfowl, as well as small game species, such as rabbit and squirrel. Suggs Mill Pond Game Land is also a black bear sanctuary, protecting core areas of habitat that encompass the relatively small home ranges of breeding females.

“We are seeking input fr


Rank (0) Views 2410 On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 7:49 AM, 516 days ago



WILLIAMSTON, N.C. (July 19, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting July 23, at 7 p.m., in Williamston to seek input in developing a management plan for Lower Roanoke River Wetlands Game Land. The meeting will be held in Building 1, Room 14, at Martin Community College.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on the State-owned portions of Lower Roanoke River Wetlands Game Land for the next 10 years. The state-owned portion comprises nearly 10,200 acres in Martin and Bertie counties and is a popular destination for deer, turkey and waterfowl hunters, anglers and birdwatchers.

“We are seeking input from all users of the Lower Roanoke River Wetlands Game Land and others who are interested in how the property is managed,” said Lands Program Manager Isaac Harrold. “This meeting is not just for hunters and anglers. It is for wildlife watche


Rank (0) Views 3672 On Thu, Jul 18, 2013 12:49 PM, 517 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 18, 2013) — Following recent reports of people seeking interaction with alligators, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding residents and visitors that feeding or harassing alligators is both illegal and dangerous.

Alligators are native to North Carolina. They are common along the coast and in the coastal plain region.

“In most instances if you see an alligator, it is not necessary to do anything other than leave it alone,” said Wildlife Officer Daniel Kennedy, stationed in Pamlico County. “The Wildlife Commission typically does not trap and relocate alligators unless it presents a real threat — not a perceived threat — to people and animals, or is in imminent danger itself.”

Feeding an alligator will cause the animal to lose its fear of people, making it more likely to approach and possibly attack someone. Kennedy currently is investigating a case of an alligator being fed,


Rank (0) Views 2492 On Thu, Jul 18, 2013 11:37 AM, 517 days ago



CASTLE HAYNE, N.C. (July 18, 2013) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is holding a public meeting July 22, at 7 p.m., in Castle Hayne to seek input in developing a management plan for Holly Shelter Game Land. The meeting will be held in the McKeithan Center, BB&T Auditorium at Cape Fear Community College, North Campus.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meeting to help guide management and user activities on Holly Shelter Game Land for the next 10 years. The Holly Shelter Game Land comprises 64,743 acres in Pender County and is a popular destination for hunters, anglers, wildlife viewers, geocachers and other outdoor enthusiasts.

“We are seeking input from all users of Holly Shelter Game Land and others who are interested in how the property is managed,” said Lands Program Manager Isaac Harrold. “This meeting is not just for hunters and anglers. It is for wildlife watchers and photographers, birding grou


Rank (0) Views 3008 On Tue, Jul 16, 2013 2:38 PM, 519 days ago



Licenses Were Biggest Catches in National Fishing and Boating Week Prize Drawing

RALEIGH, N.C. (July 16, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with Neuse Sport Shop and the N.C. Council of Trout Unlimited, presented two young anglers with lifetime licenses and certificates at the agency’s business meeting in Raleigh on July 11.

Corey Buchanan, 9, received a lifetime sportsman/coastal recreational fishing license, and Jaimee Yankow, 9, received a freshwater fishing license. Both licenses were given away as part of a statewide drawing for participants in 39 kids’ “Fish for Fun” events, which were held in May and June in celebration of National Fishing and Boating Week 2013.

Corey, who is from Spruce Pine, is an avid outdoorsman who loves to hunt and fish, which is a good thing because his lifetime license, which was donated by Neuse Sport Shop and is valued at $450, gives him statewide hunting privileges, includ


Rank (0) Views 8164 On Mon, Jul 15, 2013 12:12 PM, 520 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 15, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has approved the season dates for dove and other webless migratory game birds, as well as September seasons for Canada geese and teal.

Hunters should note several important changes to this year’s seasons and regulations: Dove season opening day is Sept. 2, a Monday. Seasons for rails, gallinules and moorhens have been split into two segments.  There is a closed period for rail hunting in late September/early October. The daily bag limit for teal in the September teal season has been increased from four teal to six teal. Possession limits for all species are now 3 times the daily bag limit. Previously, it had been 2 times the daily bag.

Shooting hours for all species are ½ hour before sunrise until sunset unless otherwisenoted.  Dove hunters should note that shooting hours for the entire season, including opening day, begin at ½ hour before sunrise.


Rank (0) Views 2982 On Fri, Jul 12, 2013 3:53 PM, 523 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 12, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will hold a public  hearing to take comments on proposed changes to game fish rules and a boating safety  rule at 10 a.m. on July 17 at its headquarters in Raleigh. The meeting will be held in the auditorium on the first floor.

The Commission proposes to amend the rule containing game fish creel and size limits and seasons, which currently includes all game fish species, so that it applies only to black bass. Amending the rule so it applies only to black bass gives the Commission an opportunity to pull existing information out of the complicated, multi-fish rule and create 15 new and simple fish rules — one for each species of game fish — except flounder, sea trout and red drum. These three species will be contained in one rule. The proposed changes, which are administrative only, would have no effect on existing creel and size limits and seasons.

“Fr


Rank (0) Views 6470 On Fri, Jul 12, 2013 2:43 PM, 523 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 12, 2013) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is holding seven public meetings in July and August to seek input in developing management plans for Commission-managed gamelands across the state.

Wildlife Commission staff will use public input from the meetings to help guide management and user activities on game lands for the next 10 years. Through its N.C. Game Lands Program, the Commission manages more than 2 million acres of public and private lands for hunters, anglers, trappers and other outdoor enthusiasts to enjoy.

“We are seeking input from all users of our game lands and others who are interested in how the properties are managed,” said Lands Program Manager Isaac Harrold. “These meetings are not just for hunters and anglers. They are for wildlife watchers and photographers, birding groups, hikers, kayakers and others who have interest in our game lands. Everyone is encouraged to provide input.”


Rank (0) Views 2931 On Fri, Jul 12, 2013 9:33 AM, 523 days ago



CHARLOTTE, N.C. (July 12, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and Duke Energy are asking boaters on the Catawba River chain of lakes to slow down and use caution because of the ongoing high water levels of several lakes. 

In recent weeks, lake levels have been higher than normal due to heavy rainfall and runoff into lakes.

“The high water can create unsafe boating conditions with submerged and floating debris,” said Erik Christofferson, chief of engineering and lands management for the Wildlife Resources Commission. “It also increases shoreline erosion and impacts shoreline property, such as docks and boathouses. We are asking boaters to reduce their speed and exercise extreme caution until conditions return to normal.”

Boaters are liable for wake damage and should be considerate of shoreline impacts. The impacts are especially magnified in smaller and narrow lakes with coves, such as Mountain Island Lake


Rank (0) Views 2417 On Thu, Jul 11, 2013 4:03 PM, 524 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 11, 2013) —The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously elected a new chairman and vice-chairman during its business meeting today to preside over the governing board of the state regulatory agency.

Jim Cogdell, of Norwood and the District 6 commissioner, will serve as chairman. John Litton Clark, of Clinton and a House Speaker Appointee At Large, will serve as vice chairman.

Cogdell replaces David Hoyle, Jr., of Dallas, who is the District 8 commissioner. Clark replaces Ray White, of Manteo, who is the District 1 commissioner.

The 19-member Commission establishes policies and regulations governing boating, hunting, trapping and inland fishing, and wildlife-conservation activities in North Carolina. Appointments to the Commission are made by the Governor, the Speaker of the State House and the President Pro Tempore of the N.C. Senate, with commissioners serving until reappointed or replaced.

As required by General Statute, at th


Rank (0) Views 2380 On Thu, Jul 11, 2013 4:17 PM, 524 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (July 11, 2013) — Eddie Bridges, a long-time conservationist and advocate of North Carolina’s wildlife and wild places, today received the Thomas L. Quay Wildlife Diversity Award, one of the most prestigious awards given by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.

The Commission presents the award annually to individuals who make outstanding contributions to wildlife diversity in North Carolina and who are considered leaders in wildlife resources conservation. 

Bridges, of Greensboro, accepted the award, along with plaque and a framed print of a Sandhills longleaf pine forest, from Commission Executive Director Gordon Myers at the agency’s business meeting in Raleigh.

“It is an honor and a privilege to present this distinguished award today to Eddie — a true conservationist who has worked tirelessly to ensure that future generations of North Carolinians have opportunities to enjoy the abundance and diversi

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