Rank (0) Views 3074 On Wed, Apr 03, 2013 8:11 AM, 666 days ago



FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (April 3, 2013) — A few openings remain for the 2ndAnnual Kayak Fish and Float Workshop, which will be held April 13 from 9 a.m.to 3 p.m. at the John E. Pechmann Fishing Education Center in Fayetteville.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is hosting the free, family-friendly workshop, along with Heroes on the Water and the Great Outdoor Provision Company, which is providing kayaks for participants to use, including smaller, 12-foot fishing kayaks ideal for teens and young adults.

Heroes on the Water, an organization that provides basic kayak fishing instruction, angling clinics and paddling classes for injured, wounded or disabled military personnel, will be selling hot dogs, chips and drinks, with all proceeds supporting kayak fishing outings for wounded service members and veterans.  

The workshop will include fishing how-to seminars and demonstrations of popular fishing kayaks. Mark Patterson,of the N.C. Kayak Fishing Association,


Rank (0) Views 2961 On Tue, Apr 02, 2013 2:00 PM, 667 days ago



BOARDMAN, N.C. (April 2, 2013) —The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is partnering with the N.C. Department of Transportation to manage a boating access area on U.S. 74 in Robeson County just outside Boardman, giving the public free, 24-hour access to the Lumber River.

Anglers fishing this section of the Lumber can catch largemouth bass, bluegill, red ear sunfish, channel catfish and redbreast sunfish. Along the river, there are opportunities for hunting deer, squirrel and other game, and it is not uncommon to see raccoon, beaver, mink, turkey and ducks.

The Boardman access area consists of a boat ramp and gravel lot. The Commission plans to renovate it in the future.

The Commission also operates three additional boating access areas along the Lumber: Wagram, McNeils Bridge and High Hill.

For more information on boating in North Carolina, including an interactive map of more than 200 free, publicly accessible boating access areas, visit www.ncwildlife.or


Rank (0) Views 2439 On Mon, Apr 01, 2013 3:40 PM, 667 days ago



HOOKERTON, N.C. (April 1) —Boaters and anglers in Greene County wishing to enter Contentnea Creek now have a new access area. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has just opened a new boating access area and fishing pier in the town of Hookerton.

A ribbon cutting will be held at 11 a.m., April 5,at 107 N. William Hooker Drive in Hookerton.

The Hookerton Boating Access Area has a new ADA-accessible concrete boat ramp with gravel parking. The 15-by-120-foot boat ramp has an 8-by-60 floating dock to assist with launching and retrieving vessels. The location also has a new ADA-accessible 10-by-30-foot fishing platform on the T-shaped, fixed fishing pier for anglers without boats..

The gravel parking area offers 18 marked spaces for vehicles with trailers and five spaces for single vehicles as well as handicapped-accessible spaces for each.

“We are very excited about the partnership withthe N.C. Wildlife Commission to build a Boating Access Area here in Hook


Rank (0) Views 2364 On Thu, Mar 28, 2013 5:03 PM, 671 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 28, 2013) — The N.C. House of Representatives adopted a resolution commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Wildlife Restoration Act, which has provided more than $14 billion in funds for state fish and wildlife research and conservation programs nationwide.

“I was happy to sponsor this resolution and bring awareness to the $3.3 billion annual impact hunters and anglers have on North Carolina’s economy and the multiple successes of our wildlife conservation programs,” said Rep. Tim D. Moffitt, who sponsored the resolution.

The Wildlife Restoration Act, also known as the Pittman-Robertson Act, authorized a federal excise tax on sporting arms, ammunition, archery equipment, and handguns. The Department of Treasury collects the excise taxes,and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dispenses money among state fish and wildlife agencies to fund projects that conserve wildlife populations and improve hunter access and hunting


Rank (0) Views 402 On Thu, Mar 28, 2013 5:00 PM, 671 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 28, 2013) — The N.C. House of Representatives adopted a resolution commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Wildlife Restoration Act, which has provided more than $14 billion in funds for state fish and wildlife research and conservation programs nationwide.

“I was happy to sponsor this resolution and bring awareness to the $3.3 billion annual impact hunters and anglers have on North Carolina’s economy and the multiple successes of our wildlife conservation programs,” said Rep. Tim D. Moffitt, who sponsored the resolution.

The Wildlife Restoration Act, also known as the Pittman-Robertson Act, authorized a federal excise tax on sporting arms, ammunition, archery equipment, and handguns. The Department of Treasury collects the excise taxes,and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dispenses money among state fish and wildlife agencies to fund projects that conserve wildlife populations and improve hunter access and hunting


Rank (0) Views 3609 On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 10:02 AM, 674 days ago



RALEIGH,N.C. (March 26, 2013) — The N.C.Wildlife Resources Commission is seeking nominees for its annual Diedrick Small Game Award.

Nominations for this year’s award are due May 1, 2013.

The award is given to an individual and anorganization whose actions significantly and positively impact North Carolina’s small game populations, including Northern bobwhite quail, ruffed grouse, squirrel and rabbit. These actions also benefit other species, including big game.

Winners receive a plaque and formal recognition at a Commission meeting in appreciation for their efforts on behalf of North Carolina small game wildlife species.  

In the individual category, past award winners were landowners who improved and integrated small game habitat into their forestry or farming operations. In the organization category, past award winners included corporations, government agencies, and non-government organizations whose actions improved small game habi


Rank (0) Views 5153 On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 1:14 PM, 675 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 25, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has selected Chester “Chet” Clark to be the Hunter Education Specialist for Hertford, Gates, Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Bertie, Martin, Washington, Tyrrell, Dare and Hyde counties.

A resident of Jarvisburg in Currituck County, Clark will be responsible for providing instruction in hunter ethics and responsibility, wildlife management and conservation, firearms, wildlife identification, survival and first aid, specialty hunting and tree stand safety.

Clark replaces David Denton, who retired after 29 years of service. Clark was previously a wildlife educator at the Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education in Corolla.

“Hunting education is so much more than firearms safety, although that is a key aspect that I will stress,” said Clark. “But these classes and workshops also build support and enthusiasm for conservation. My go


Rank (0) Views 5830 On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 3:11 PM, 678 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 22, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources has available new fisheries reports from four major coastal rivers — the Roanoke, Tar, Neuse and Cape Fear.

The Coastal Rivers Fisheries Reports will replace the Roanoke River Fishing Report, which has been a popular feature on the agency’s website each spring for the last 10 years.

The new fisheries reports will comprise information gleaned from Commission fisheries biologists who conduct electrofishing sampling for striped bass, American shad and hickory shad each spring. The reports will share the results of biologists’ fish-sampling work and creel clerks’ surveys to let anglers know what Wildlife Commission staff is seeing on the water and hearing at the boat ramps.

The reports, which will be posted frequently starting today through mid-May, will provide information on some of the catch, effort and harvest data that the Commission uses to manage these important


Rank (0) Views 2537 On Wed, Mar 20, 2013 4:38 PM, 679 days ago



TROY,N.C. (March 20, 2013) —The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will be one of several conservation partners hosting a family-friendly Nature Day at the N.C. Zoo’s Nichols Longleaf Preserve on April 13, from 1-4 p.m. 

 

Members of the Greater Uwharrie Conservation Partnership will be on hand to provide guided hikes of the preserve, activities for children and presentations on prescribed fire, local history, wildlife, invasive species and the longleaf pine ecosystem.

The recently protected Nichols Longleaf Preserve has some of the oldest longleafpine in the Piedmont region.  

“This is an opportunity to explore an awesome piece of property and see longleaf pines over 200 years old,” said John Isenhour, technical assistance biologist with the Wildlife Commission. “Most folks don’t realize the historic range of longleaf pines extended into the Piedmont, or that a mature stand of longleaf th


Rank (0) Views 2728 On Tue, Mar 19, 2013 1:32 PM, 681 days ago



WILMINGTON, N.C. (March 19, 2013) —The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has scheduled a public meeting to hear comments on a proposal to convert approximately 200 acres of Sutton Lake Game Land to archery-only hunting.

The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 27 in theNew Hanover County Cooperative Extension auditorium at 6206 Oleander Drive in Wilmington. 

The proposed change involves a narrow strip of property along the Cape Fear River and does not restrict the use of firearms for waterfowl hunting on the lake. 

For more information about game lands in North Carolina, including an interactive map, visit http://www.ncwildlife.org/Hunting/WheretoHunt/PublicPlaces.aspx.


Rank (0) Views 2677 On Mon, Mar 18, 2013 12:09 PM, 682 days ago



MATTHEWS, N.C. (March 18, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will be one of several exhibitors helping the Town of Matthews and the Habitat and Wildlife Keepers (HAWK) celebrate the town’s designation as a Community Wildlife Habitat at “A Day at Play,” on Saturday.

The family-friendly event, which is free and open to the public, will be held at Squirrel Lake Park, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

From 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Wildlife Commission staff will conduct a Fish-for-Fun event, which is open to everyone — no special skills necessary. In addition to loaning free rods and reels for the day, the Commission is giving away Fish-for-Fun goody bags, filled with fish identification guides, fish stickers and tattoos, pencils and coloring books.

Other activities during the event include a raptor release by the Carolina Raptor Center, a tree identification walk, bird walks, classes on obtaining backyard habitat certi


Rank (0) Views 4247 On Mon, Mar 18, 2013 9:41 AM, 682 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (March 18, 2013) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will open approximately 1,100 miles of Hatchery-Supported Trout Waters in 25 western counties at 7 a.m. on April 6. The season will run through Feb. 28, 2014.

While fishing on Hatchery-Supported Trout Waters, anglers can harvest a maximum of seven trout per day, with no minimum size limits or bait restrictions.

Hatchery-Supported Trout Waters, marked by green-and-white signs, are stocked from March until August every year, depending on the individual stream. A list of numbers and species stocked by month and county can be found on the Commission’s website. Many of these waters are stocked monthly, although some heavily fished waters are stocked more frequently. 

Commission personnel will stock nearly 894,000 trout, with 96 percent of the stocked fish averaging 10 inches in length and the other fish exceeding 14 inches.

Stocked trout are produced primarily in two mountain r

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