Rank (0) Views 5863 On Thu, Nov 17, 2011 10:24 AM, 888 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 17, 2011) – The District Attorney’s Office for Randolph County today dismissed charges against a man charged with holding deer illegally.

The case stems from charges against Clifton Wayne Kindley on Sept. 20, when a warrant was served on his unlicensed deer pen in Randolph County, resulting in nine deer being seized and euthanized.


According to North Carolina law, it is illegal to hold or confine deer, elk or other cervid animals in the state without a permit or license, with strict requirements necessary to safeguard the health and safety of wildlife resources, livestock and humans. In this case, Kindley had been notified repeatedly of these important requirements as far back as 2003.

“We recognize the district attorney’s authority to dismiss this charge; however, our actions in this matter, although unpopular, were directed towards safeguarding North Carolina’s wildlife resources,” said Gordon


Rank (0) Views 4951 On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 1:20 PM, 890 days ago



CURRITUCK, N.C. (November 15, 2011) – When Hurricane Irene took down two of the four waterfowl blinds in Currituck Sound  on a N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission game land, the biologists and technicians knew exactly who to call. And it wasn’t seasoned carpenters or longtime experts. They called Jeff Rhodes, and his woodshop students at Currituck High School. The decision to call Rhodes was natural – his students had made several blinds for the Wildlife Commission in the late 1990s. The students also have built blinds for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The well-made, high-quality blinds had withstood hurricanes and tropical storms for more than a decade when two blinds fell before Hurricane Irene’s fury in August. So the Wildlife Commission asked Rhodes if his students could quickly build a couple of replacement blinds – in time for the hunters who would soon flock to the Currituck Banks Game Land for waterfowl season


Rank (0) Views 5835 On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 1:10 PM, 890 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 15, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is seeking nominations through Jan. 30 for the seventh annual Thomas L. Quay Award.    

The award recognizes individuals who make outstanding contributions to wildlife diversity in North Carolina and who are considered leaders in wildlife resources conservation.   

Anyone interested in nominating someone for the award must submit a nomination form and a detailed explanation of the nominee’s contributions to wildlife conservation. The explanation is limited to two pages (8 ½ x 11-inch paper, with 1-inch margins, single spaced and 12-point font). Submissions that exceed the 2-page limit will be disqualified and returned to the nominator.  

Download the nomination form at ncwildlife.org. Click on the “Thomas L. Quay Award” scrolling icon located at the bottom of the home page. Subm


Rank (0) Views 3198 On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 12:51 PM, 891 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 14, 2011) Download the PDF below for  the 2012 Commission Meeting Schedule. 2012 Commission Meeting Schedule (PDF) Visit the Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 2366 On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 12:00 AM, 895 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Jan. 13, 2011) – The Commissioners of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously adopted a resolution Thursday reaffirming their longstanding support for hunting with the use of dogs.

“We support the use of dogs in hunting in North Carolina where such hunting is consistent with the sound conservation of our state’s treasured wildlife resources and not contrary to the protection of the private property rights of its citizens,” said Gordon Myers, executive director of the Commission. “Hunting with dogs is part of a centuries old tradition in North Carolina and the members of the Wildlife Resources Commission determined that it was important to clarify their position regarding those practices.”

The partnership of hunters and hunting dogs, commissioners affirmed, has long been a central thread of North Carolina hunting culture, and thousands of hunters – young and old – use dogs to


Rank (0) Views 7125 On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 3:03 PM, 895 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 10, 2011) – Dr. Louis Daniel, director of the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, issued a proclamation today implementing new recreational limits for spotted seatrout, effective Nov. 14, in coastal and joint waters. 

These new recreational regulations also apply to inland fishing waters managed by the N.C. Wildlife Commission. A rule that went into effect in August standardized seasons and size and creel limits in inland waters for four saltwater fish species, including spotted seatrout, by referencing those recreational regulations set by the Marine Fisheries Commission in adjacent joint and coastal waters. 

Effective Monday Nov. 14, the new recreational regulations for spotted seatrout will be a four-fish daily creel limit per person with a 14-inch minimum size limit. The proclamation also eliminates the restriction that no more than two spotted seatrout larger than 24 inches may be kept in the daily creel. 

Changes to


Rank (0) Views 1495 On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 2:45 PM, 895 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 10, 2011) – Dr. Louis Daniel, director of the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, issued a proclamation today implementing new recreational limits for spotted seatrout, effective Nov. 14, in coastal and joint waters. 

These new recreational regulations also apply to inland fishing waters managed by the N.C. Wildlife Commission. A rule that went into effect in August standardized seasons and size and creel limits in inland waters for four saltwater fish species, including spotted seatrout, by referencing those recreational regulations set by the Marine Fisheries Commission in adjacent joint and coastal waters. 

Effective Monday Nov. 14, the new recreational regulations for spotted seatrout will be a four-fish daily creel limit per person with a 14-inch minimum size limit. The proclamation also eliminates the restriction that no more than two spotted seatrout larger than 24 inches may be kept in the daily creel. 

Ch


Rank (0) Views 4935 On Wed, Nov 09, 2011 3:05 PM, 896 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 9, 2011) –  For people looking to make their property more inviting to reptiles and amphibians, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has on its website a new publication that provides tips on creating suitable habitat for frogs, toads, lizards and snakes.   

“Reptiles and Amphibians in Your Backyard,” is a color, 8-page publication that was produced by biologists from N.C. State University, the Wildlife Commission, N.C. Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, and the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences.  

“Many of the practices explained in the book to attract reptiles and amphibians are easy and fairly quick to do, even for folks who aren’t gardeners,” said Jeff Hall, the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Biologist with the Commission. “It’s mainly a matter of taking these critters into consideration when man


Rank (0) Views 4288 On Wed, Nov 09, 2011 2:31 PM, 896 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 9, 2011) – Ongoing drought conditions have led to less-than-desirable conditions for late-season waterfowl hunts on the Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Land. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will not be able to flood the Flat River Impoundment, which is used for permit hunts only, and the Brickhouse Road and Little River Greentree Impoundments due to the severe drought that has affected the Northern Piedmont part of the state. Though it has rained in recent weeks, it has not rained enough to raise the water levels in Flat River and Knapp of Reeds Creek to the depth needed for pumping water into the impoundments.  Knapp of Reeds Greentree Impoundment has some available water to hunt, but it is not at full pool. The Butner Depot, Beaverdam and Bluff Impoundments, which are used for permit hunts only, as well as Patterson Road Greentree Impoundment, have adequate water for hunting.  To receive the latest updates on waterfowl imp


Rank (0) Views 3074 On Tue, Nov 08, 2011 9:36 AM, 897 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (November 8, 2011) Download the PDFs below for committee meeting agendas. Nov. 9, 2011 at 10 a.m.  Big Game Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF) Nov. 9, 2011 at 1 p.m.    Fisheries Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF) Nov. 9, 2011 at 3 p.m.    Boating Safety Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF)   Visit the Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 14767 On Mon, Nov 07, 2011 4:42 PM, 898 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 7, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is alerting hunters that they may encounter sick or diseased deer afflicted with hemorrhagic disease. Two closely related viruses — epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus and bluetongue virus — cause hemorrhagic disease and both are spread by biting flies, called midges.    

The Commission is asking hunters to report any sightings of the disease, which has no human health implications but is one of the most significant infectious diseases of white-tailed deer in North Carolina. Hemorrhagic disease should not be confused with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which is a distinctly different disease that occurs in members of the deer family.  Extensive monitoring since 1999 has yielded no evidence of CWD in North Carolina and strict regulations are in place to prevent the introduction of this disease.

Symptoms of hemorrhagic disease in deer va


Rank (0) Views 2582 On Mon, Nov 07, 2011 9:37 AM, 898 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (November 7, 2011) Download the PDF below for the meeting agenda package. November 10, 2011 Commission Meeting Agenda Package (PDF) Visit Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.

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