Rank (0) Views 3191 On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 12:51 PM, 886 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 14, 2011) Download the PDF below for  the 2012 Commission Meeting Schedule. 2012 Commission Meeting Schedule (PDF) Visit the Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 2358 On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 12:00 AM, 890 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Jan. 13, 2011) – The Commissioners of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission unanimously adopted a resolution Thursday reaffirming their longstanding support for hunting with the use of dogs.

“We support the use of dogs in hunting in North Carolina where such hunting is consistent with the sound conservation of our state’s treasured wildlife resources and not contrary to the protection of the private property rights of its citizens,” said Gordon Myers, executive director of the Commission. “Hunting with dogs is part of a centuries old tradition in North Carolina and the members of the Wildlife Resources Commission determined that it was important to clarify their position regarding those practices.”

The partnership of hunters and hunting dogs, commissioners affirmed, has long been a central thread of North Carolina hunting culture, and thousands of hunters – young and old – use dogs to


Rank (0) Views 7104 On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 3:03 PM, 890 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 10, 2011) – Dr. Louis Daniel, director of the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, issued a proclamation today implementing new recreational limits for spotted seatrout, effective Nov. 14, in coastal and joint waters. 

These new recreational regulations also apply to inland fishing waters managed by the N.C. Wildlife Commission. A rule that went into effect in August standardized seasons and size and creel limits in inland waters for four saltwater fish species, including spotted seatrout, by referencing those recreational regulations set by the Marine Fisheries Commission in adjacent joint and coastal waters. 

Effective Monday Nov. 14, the new recreational regulations for spotted seatrout will be a four-fish daily creel limit per person with a 14-inch minimum size limit. The proclamation also eliminates the restriction that no more than two spotted seatrout larger than 24 inches may be kept in the daily creel. 

Changes to


Rank (0) Views 1490 On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 2:45 PM, 890 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 10, 2011) – Dr. Louis Daniel, director of the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, issued a proclamation today implementing new recreational limits for spotted seatrout, effective Nov. 14, in coastal and joint waters. 

These new recreational regulations also apply to inland fishing waters managed by the N.C. Wildlife Commission. A rule that went into effect in August standardized seasons and size and creel limits in inland waters for four saltwater fish species, including spotted seatrout, by referencing those recreational regulations set by the Marine Fisheries Commission in adjacent joint and coastal waters. 

Effective Monday Nov. 14, the new recreational regulations for spotted seatrout will be a four-fish daily creel limit per person with a 14-inch minimum size limit. The proclamation also eliminates the restriction that no more than two spotted seatrout larger than 24 inches may be kept in the daily creel. 

Ch


Rank (0) Views 4914 On Wed, Nov 09, 2011 3:05 PM, 891 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 9, 2011) –  For people looking to make their property more inviting to reptiles and amphibians, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has on its website a new publication that provides tips on creating suitable habitat for frogs, toads, lizards and snakes.   

“Reptiles and Amphibians in Your Backyard,” is a color, 8-page publication that was produced by biologists from N.C. State University, the Wildlife Commission, N.C. Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, and the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences.  

“Many of the practices explained in the book to attract reptiles and amphibians are easy and fairly quick to do, even for folks who aren’t gardeners,” said Jeff Hall, the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Biologist with the Commission. “It’s mainly a matter of taking these critters into consideration when man


Rank (0) Views 4278 On Wed, Nov 09, 2011 2:31 PM, 891 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 9, 2011) – Ongoing drought conditions have led to less-than-desirable conditions for late-season waterfowl hunts on the Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Land. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will not be able to flood the Flat River Impoundment, which is used for permit hunts only, and the Brickhouse Road and Little River Greentree Impoundments due to the severe drought that has affected the Northern Piedmont part of the state. Though it has rained in recent weeks, it has not rained enough to raise the water levels in Flat River and Knapp of Reeds Creek to the depth needed for pumping water into the impoundments.  Knapp of Reeds Greentree Impoundment has some available water to hunt, but it is not at full pool. The Butner Depot, Beaverdam and Bluff Impoundments, which are used for permit hunts only, as well as Patterson Road Greentree Impoundment, have adequate water for hunting.  To receive the latest updates on waterfowl imp


Rank (0) Views 3068 On Tue, Nov 08, 2011 9:36 AM, 893 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (November 8, 2011) Download the PDFs below for committee meeting agendas. Nov. 9, 2011 at 10 a.m.  Big Game Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF) Nov. 9, 2011 at 1 p.m.    Fisheries Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF) Nov. 9, 2011 at 3 p.m.    Boating Safety Committee Meeting Agenda (PDF)   Visit the Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 14732 On Mon, Nov 07, 2011 4:42 PM, 893 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 7, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is alerting hunters that they may encounter sick or diseased deer afflicted with hemorrhagic disease. Two closely related viruses — epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus and bluetongue virus — cause hemorrhagic disease and both are spread by biting flies, called midges.    

The Commission is asking hunters to report any sightings of the disease, which has no human health implications but is one of the most significant infectious diseases of white-tailed deer in North Carolina. Hemorrhagic disease should not be confused with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which is a distinctly different disease that occurs in members of the deer family.  Extensive monitoring since 1999 has yielded no evidence of CWD in North Carolina and strict regulations are in place to prevent the introduction of this disease.

Symptoms of hemorrhagic disease in deer va


Rank (0) Views 2574 On Mon, Nov 07, 2011 9:37 AM, 894 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (November 7, 2011) Download the PDF below for the meeting agenda package. November 10, 2011 Commission Meeting Agenda Package (PDF) Visit Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 8488 On Fri, Nov 04, 2011 1:39 PM, 896 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (November 4, 2011) – With hunting season under way, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has posted information on its website about the new Landowner Protection Act.

The law, which went into effect Oct. 1, requires hunters, anglers and trappers to obtain written permission from a landowner or leaseholder before hunting, fishing or trapping on privately owned, posted property — including land, waters, ponds or legally established waterfowl blinds.

The Wildlife Commission’s website, www.ncwildlife.org, has answers to frequently asked questions, a fact sheet and a sample permission form (full size and wallet size) about this law.

The Landowner Protection Act provides two ways for landowners to post their lands to allow only hunters, trappers and anglers with written permission to enter their property legally. Landowners can now post their land by using vertical purple paint marks on posts or trees, or, as in the past, by p


Rank (0) Views 3290 On Thu, Nov 03, 2011 3:41 PM, 897 days ago

This course is for the certification and recertification of Wildlife Damage Control Agents. The workshop will provide you with the rules and regulations that govern the WDCA pro-gram, information on euthanasia, safe handling of wildlife, and a variety of other information that will be useful for WDCA’s. Agents must pass a closed book certification examination and a criminal background check prior to being certified. Once you have received notification of certification you may begin operating in a WDCA capacity. Learn more about the workshop and registration.


Rank (0) Views 3414 On Wed, Nov 02, 2011 10:45 AM, 898 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Nov. 2, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has promoted Todd Kennedy to the rank of major, with responsibilities for field operations within the Division of Law Enforcement.

Kennedy will supervise a statewide hierarchy of some 200 wildlife officers, who enforce fish and game regulations and boating laws. He was previously the captain and a lieutenant in District 5, a jurisdiction that includes Alamance, Rockingham, Orange, Granville, Durham, Person, Caswell, Randolph, Chatham, Lee and Guilford counties. He had been stationed in District 5 for the past 16 years.

“I look forward to this service and the challenge of the job,” said Maj. Kennedy. “The men and women wearing the uniform are important for conservation and public safety, through education and enforcement. I value being a part of the tradition of being a wildlife officer in North Carolina.”

A 22-year veteran with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Com

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