Rank (0) Views 3735 On Wed, May 04, 2011 12:00 AM, 1038 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (May 4, 2011) – Though white-tailed fawns seen hiding in the grass may look abandoned and very much alone, they usually are not, and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is urging the public not to approach, touch, feed or move them. Contact with a human may harm the animal more than help it.

Whitetails are a “hider” species, which means the female will hide her fawn in vegetation during the first two or three weeks of its life as she feeds. Spotted and lacking scent, fawns are well-camouflaged and usually remain undetected by predators. The doe will return to the fawn several times a day to nurse and clean it, staying only a few minutes each time before leaving again to seek food. A human may never see the doe and think the fawn needs help or food. But staying away is a better option.

The fawn is well-equipped to protect itself. By the time it is 5 days old, already it can outrun a human. At 3 to 6 weeks of age, fawns can escape most


Rank (0) Views 2635 On Fri, May 27, 2011 12:00 AM, 1041 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (May 27, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has completed renovations to the Washington Baum Bridge Boating Access Area, which is now open to the public.

“The improved traffic flow at this site will give boaters easier, more convenient access to the Roanoke Sound, the Pamlico Sound and our state’s other coastal waters,” said Erik Christofferson, chief of the Commission’s Division of Engineering Services. “We are grateful for the money we received from sales of the Coastal Recreational Fishing License that allowed us to replace some of the failing infrastructure of this popular site, in particular some 1,400 feet of bulkhead.”

Sales of the CRFL paid for 50 percent of the renovation, while funding from motorboat registration receipts paid for the rest.

Washington Baum Bridge also has new ADA-accessible floating docks, one additional ramp for a total of five ramps and an addition of ab


Rank (0) Views 4444 On Tue, Oct 25, 2011 1:25 PM, 1041 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (October 25, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will hold a public hearing on Nov. 7 to receive comments on proposed temporary rules that will allow the trapping of feral hogs with no closed season and no bag limits.

The hearing will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education, which is located at 1751 Varsity Drive in Raleigh.

If adopted, the temporary rules will go into effect Dec. 29. Permanent rules may be adopted at a later date.

Under the new rules, trappers must have a free, Commission-issued permit in addition to a hunting or trapping license, and feral hogs may be live-trapped using traps constructed in such a way that a non-target animal can be released easily or escape without harm.

The new rules also require trappers to place permit numbers on all traps. Feral swine must be euthanized while in the trap and may not be removed alive from any trap.

Under current rules, feral swine m


Rank (0) Views 2875 On Tue, May 31, 2011 12:00 AM, 1041 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (May 31, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission presented the 2010 Lawrence G. Diedrick Small Game Award to Piedmont landowner Ernie Koury and the Southeast North Carolina Chapter of Quail Forever, at its May Commission meeting.

Koury oversees thousands of acres of private land, protecting holdings in Person, Caswell, Alamance and Chatham counties from development. For 22 years, Koury has managed his property to enhance early successional habitat and produce a healthy bobwhite quail population. Koury, working with a group of fellow hunters and with the guidance of wildlife and forestry personnel, uses clear cutting, thinning, prescribed burning and spraying to maintain the habitat – replanting the pines when necessary.

The Southeast North Carolina Chapter of Quail Forever has assisted in funding several habitat improvement projects that have improved small game habitat while contributing toward the longleaf pine wiregrass ecosystem r


Rank (0) Views 6227 On Tue, Oct 25, 2011 9:25 AM, 1042 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 25, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is offering a special youth-only deer hunting opportunity on Dec. 10 near New Bern. To be eligible, participants must be between 12 and 16 years old and have successfully completed a hunter education course.

The hunt will be held at the Weyerhaeuser-Cool Springs Environmental Education Center between Vanceboro and New Bern on U.S. 17.

“This is a chance for an enjoyable and memorable outdoor experience, with guidance and assistance available every step of the way,” said BB Gillen, the Wildlife Commission’s outdoor skills coordinator who will lead the hunt. “We always have fun at these events.”

The cost is $5 per youth hunter and the deadline to purchase a permit is Dec. 1. Participation is limited. Permits can be purchased at any Wildlife Service Agent location or by calling 1-888-248-6834.

During the hunt, the youth must be accompanied by a licen


Rank (0) Views 2500 On Tue, Oct 25, 2011 9:10 AM, 1042 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (October 25, 2011) Download the PDF below for the proposed temporary rules on the feral hog trapping proposal. Feral Hog Trapping Proposal (PDF) Visit Public Notices in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 3281 On Mon, Oct 24, 2011 4:06 PM, 1042 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (October 24, 2011) Download the PDF below for the October 13, 2011 Commission Meeting Actions. October 13, 2011 Commission Meeting Actions (PDF) Visit Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 4439 On Thu, Oct 20, 2011 12:44 PM, 1046 days ago



SEA LEVEL, N.C. (October 20, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has completed renovations to the Salter’s Creek Boating Access Area, which is now open to the public.

The ramp was replaced, and a fixed dock was replaced with a larger, floating dock with handrails to assist disabled boaters. Wildlife Commission staff also replaced the bulkhead and improved the maneuvering area.

“This site in Carteret County gives boaters more convenient access to Salter’s Creek and the waters of the Pamlico and Core sounds,” said Erik Christofferson, chief of the Commission’s Division of Engineering Services. “This site is frequented by recreational boaters and local commercial fishermen and women, along with deer and duck hunters. We hope they are as excited about this facelift to Salter’s Creek as we are.”

Renovations to the boating access area were funded from motorboat registration receipts.


Rank (0) Views 6453 On Wed, Oct 19, 2011 5:33 PM, 1047 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (Oct. 19, 2011) – Tissue samples from deer seized by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission from an unlicensed Randolph County facility on Sept. 20 tested negative for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

CWD is a highly contagious and devastating disease of cervid species, which include deer, caribou, moose and elk. North Carolina is home to white-tailed deer and elk in the wild, and other cervid species that are held in licensed facilities. CWD was not detected in samples analyzed by National Veterinary Services Laboratories, of Ames, Iowa, a section of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission Executive Director Gordon Myers said, “The State is very fortunate that CWD was not detected in tissue samples taken from these animals. Had these test results been positive, it would have presented significant biological, economical and sociological impacts throughout North Carolina.  Captive deer of unknown origin pose


Rank (0) Views 3601 On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 7:56 AM, 1049 days ago

RALEIGH, N.C. (October 18, 2011) Download the PDF below for the November Commission and Committee meeting schedule. November 2011 Commission and Committee Meetings Notice (PDF) Visit Meetings/Actions in the About section for more information.


Rank (0) Views 3069 On Thu, Oct 13, 2011 9:06 AM, 1054 days ago



BREVARD, N.C. (Oct. 13, 2011) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will teach a free, hands-on “Outdoor Cooking with Wild Game” class from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Oct. 22 at the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education.

Wildlife Commission staff has designed the class to be an ideal learning opportunity for hunters, campers and aspiring chefs.  Topics will include equipment, preparation and cooking techniques best suited for the outdoors and wild game. Instructors will share their best recipes and participants will be able to sample the dishes.

Space is limited and pre-registration is required by calling 828-877-4423 or by registering online through the Pisgah Calendar.

The Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education is one of four learning facilities operated by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. Located near Brevard off U.S. 276 and next to the Davidson River, the Pisgah Center offers free admission, daily showings of a


Rank (0) Views 3291 On Wed, Oct 12, 2011 4:28 PM, 1054 days ago



RALEIGH, N.C. (October 12, 2011) – Visit the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s exhibit at the N.C. State Fair to learn how the Commission uses science and public involvement to conserve wildlife.

The exhibit, located downhill from the Village of Yesteryear, is open to the public 3-8 p.m. on Oct. 13, and from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., on Oct. 14-23.

“Fairgoers will learn how Wildlife Commission biologists work with the public to study wildlife across the state. We’ll showcase studies of mourning doves and gopher frogs, black bears and Northern flying squirrels,” said Margaret Martin, field outreach manager for the Commission. “The exhibit has fun, hands-on activities for children and adults alike.”

Visitors to the exhibit can view an electrofishing boat that biologists use to study fish, check out a huge trap used to study bears, and see how scientists determine the age of various animal species.

Visitors also c

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