North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission

N.C. Wildlife News Brief - March 26, 2014

Jon Evans Named New Wildlife Enforcement Chief

Jon Evans has been promoted to colonel and chief of the agency’s Division of Law Enforcement. He supervises a statewide team of 209 wildlife officers who enforce conservation and boating laws, and fish and wildlife regulations. A wildlife officer since 1996, Evans has served as director of wildlife officer training since 2011. More.

 

River Herring Regulation in Effect in Coastal Rivers

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding anglers that they cannot harvest or possess blueback herring and alewife, collectively known as “river herring,”greater than 6 inches in length while boating on or fishing in inland fishing waters of coastal rivers and their tributaries.

The regulation, which went into effect Aug. 1, 2013, applies to all river herring, regardless of origin, in inland fishing waters of the Roanoke, Tar, Neuse, Cape Fear, Waccamaw and Pee Dee rivers and their tributaries up to the first impoundment of the main course of the river, the Lumber River, including Drowning Creek, and all other inland fishing waters east of I-95. More.


Wild Turkey Season Gets Underway in April

The statewide spring season for wild turkeys, male and bearded turkeys only, is April 12 through May 10, 2014. Youth season is April 5 through April 11, 2014. During youth season, only turkey hunting by youth (less than 16 years old) is allowed statewide. Each youth hunting during this season must be accompanied by an adult at least 21 years old. The adult may accompany more than one youth during a particular hunt and the adult may NOT harvest a turkey. Each youth must have a Big Game Harvest Report Card and report harvests. License-exempt youth should report their harvest using a Big Game Harvest Report Card for License-Exempt Hunters. The daily limit is one and the possession and season limit is 2, only one of which may be taken during the youth season. More


Hatchery-Supported Trout Waters Open April 5 at 7 a.m.

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will open approximately 1,000 miles of hatchery-supported trout waters in 25 western counties at 7 a.m. on April 5. The season will run through Feb. 28, 2015. While fishing on hatchery-supported trout waters, anglers can harvest a maximum of seven trout per day, with no minimum size limits or bait restrictions. More.


Tax Deadline is April 15; Donate on Line  31 of N.C. State Tax Income Form and Keep North Carolina Wild

Help keep North Carolina wild when completing a N.C. State Income tax form  by donating to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund on line 31. Your donation — no matter how much —will help the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission conduct research, conservation and monitoring work that benefits animals not hunted or fished — animals such as songbirds, sea turtles, eagles, salamanders, frogs, turtles, bats and more! More.

 

Officials Request Assistance in Investigation of Gunshot Death of Red Wolf

Along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife  Service, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is investigating the suspected illegal shooting death of a second red wolf this year in eastern North Carolina. The Wildlife Commission urges anyone with information to call USFWS Resident Agent in Charge John Elofson at (404)763-7959, Refuge Officer Frank Simms at (252) 216-7504, or North Carolina Wildlife Officer Robert Wayne at (252) 216-8225. More



 


Spring Blowout Sale at N.C. Wild Store

Getting ready for spring? Here’s how we can help you :

  • All Things Connected DVD - discounted to $4.50.
  • The Frogs and Toads of North Carolina (book and CD)- reduced from $15.00 to just $7.00
  • Guide to Snakes of North Carolina (book) - reduced from $8.95 to only $6.00

Visit the Commission’s Wild Store to place your order.


Commission Biologists Seek Help from Anglers to Stop the Spread of Rusty Crayfish

A destructive, non-native crayfish has invaded the upper Catawba River in western North Carolina, and Wildlife Commission biologists are asking anglers to help stop the spread of the rusty crayfish. The rusty crayfish has a rust-colored spot on its sides, just in front of the tail. It has black bands on the tips of its claws. Anyone who finds one is asked to kill it immediately, note its location, freeze it, and contact TR Russ at Thomas.russ@ncwildlife.org. More


Space Still Available for a Women-Only Fly-Fishing Weekend in Brevard

Space is available for a women-only fly-fishing weekend offered by the Wildlife Commission and sponsored by Davidson River Outfitters. The Beyond Becoming an Outdoors-Woman fly-fishing weekend is April 4-6 at the Pisgah Wildlife Center for Education and Davidson River Campground in Transylvania County. Cost is $125 per person and includes all instruction, equipment and camping for the weekend, plus lunch and snacks on Saturday. To register or for more information, contact BB Gillen at bb.gillen@ncwildlife.org, 919-218-3638.

 
 

Other News

Wildlife Commission Schedules Habitat Management Seminar in Raleigh on April 24

Wildlife Commission Seeks Public Input for Upper Tar Game Land Complex Planning on April 10 in Hollister

Wildlife Commission Seeks Public Input for Whitehall Plantation Game Land Planning on April 8

Wildlife Commission Seeks Public Input for Pee Dee River Game Land Planning on April 3

New Program for Military offered at Pechmann Fishing Center


Contact Us

Boat Registration
For vessel registration/renewal inquiries contact vessels@ncwildlife.org
Licenses
For general license and lifetime license inquiries contact licenses@ncwildlife.org
Other
For enforcement, hunting/boating saftey, boading access areas, fisheries or wildlife management questions, Web site and/or other question or comments email wrcomments@ncwildlife.org

WILD NOTES

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Learn About North Carolina's Wildlife

The Wildlife Commission operates four learning centers across the state, each ofwhich hosts seminars, workshops and activities throughout the year. Admission and most events are free. Families and groups can enjoy interactive exhibits and displays. Learn more at www.ncwildlife.org/learning.

Donate on N.C. State Tax Income Form to Keep N.C. Wild

Help keep North Carolina wild when completing a N.C. State Income tax form this taxseason by donating to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund. Your donation will help the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission conduct research, conservation and monitoring work that benefits animals not hunted or fished —animals such as songbirds, sea turtles, eagles, salamanders, frogs, turtles and bats.

Purchase a Wildlife Plate & Support Conservation