North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
Five things to know about trout fishing in North Carolina

Five things to know about trout fishing in North Carolina

Trout fishing is a big deal in North Carolina! Here are five cool facts about trout fishing in our state:

1.      It brings in money and jobs. Trout fishing is a huge economic benefit to our state. In 2014, it brought in an estimated $383 million and supported 3,600 jobs each year.

2.      NC has more native populations of Brook Trout than anywhere in the Southeast! The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) carefully manages these populations, and also . . .

Thursday, May 18, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (47)/Comments (0)/
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New Fact Sheet Addresses Status of North Carolina’s River Herring

New Fact Sheet Addresses Status of North Carolina’s River Herring

Ten years have passed since a harvest moratorium for river herring was put in place in North Carolina’s waters, and anglers are asking questions. “What’s the status of the river herring population in North Carolina?” “Can we fish for river herring now?” “Can we use herring for bait again?” “What are the criteria for relaxing the harvest moratorium on river herring?”

Answers to these questions and more about alewife and blueback herring — collectively called “river herring” — can be found in a new fact sheet about river herring developed by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (49)/Comments (0)/
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Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

Wildlife Commission Debunks Hellbender Bounty Rumor

A $200 bounty on hellbenders? Say it’s not so.

“That is a rumor and absolutely untrue,” said Lori Williams, a Wildlife Diversity biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. “Furthermore, the Eastern hellbender is listed as a species of special concern in North Carolina. Harming, harassing, collecting or killing one is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can result in a fine and up to 120 days in jail.”

Hellbenders are one of the largest salamanders found in North Carolina, averaging 16-17 inches long but can grow up to 24 inches long.

Also called the “water dog,” “snot otter,” “Alleghany alligator,” among other names, the hellbender is a harmless, giant aquatic salamander found in fast-moving, clean mountain streams in . . .
 

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Tuesday, May 09, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (12123)/Comments (0)/
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Help! I found a wild animal!

Help! I found a wild animal!

Would you know what to do if you find an injured wild animal? Do you know who to call for wildlife problems or concerns? The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission receives thousands of calls each year on these kinds of issues, so we thought we’d share a few frequently asked questions that come up in the spring and our best advice for each scenario. I found a fawn! Female deer hide their fawns while they feed, returning several times a day to care for them. People find these fawns and worry that they have been orphaned, but most of the time, they’re not. Unless the fawn is in distress (calling incessantly, visibly injured, or found next to a dead doe), we advise people to leave it in place and check back in 24 hours. If it’s still in the same spot the next day, call a licensed fawn rehabilitator for guidance. I found a bird that can’t fly! In the spring, people often call to report a bird fluttering... (click blog title to read more)
Monday, April 17, 2017/Author: Naomi Avissar/Number of views (195)/Comments (0)/
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Wild turkeys in North Carolina: The long road to recovery

Wild turkeys in North Carolina: The long road to recovery

The recovery of the wild turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, is one of North Carolina’s greatest wildlife success stories. But it was a long road to get our wild turkey population back to its current level. Wild turkeys were historically plentiful in our state, but unregulated hunting and large-scale deforestation caused their population to plummet in the early 1900s. Early recovery efforts were undertaken from 1928–1946, which involved releasing pen-raised birds and eggs into the wild. Unfortunately, those birds weren’t accustomed to predators and extreme weather conditions. The birds perished, and the wild turkey population continued to crash. READ MORE

Wednesday, April 05, 2017/Author: NCWRC blogger/Number of views (424)/Comments (0)/
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